The Nature of Consciousness

So what's really going on?

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tapaticmadness
Posts: 346
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Re: The Nature of Consciousness

Post by tapaticmadness » Mon Feb 03, 2020 2:27 am

henry quirk wrote:
Mon Feb 03, 2020 1:49 am
tapaticmadness wrote:
Sun Feb 02, 2020 10:06 pm
henry quirk wrote:
Sun Feb 02, 2020 3:32 pm
I'm not too interested in what Manson had to say on any subject.

He was a loon and it's good he's dead.
I think I have never felt righteous indignation at anything or anyone. I really don't understand it.
He, Manson, was a cancer. One doesn't get indignant over a cancer.

You just cut it out.
What do you think of the Marquis de Sade? What do you think of those people into S&M?

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henry quirk
Posts: 7697
Joined: Fri May 09, 2008 8:07 pm

Re: The Nature of Consciousness

Post by henry quirk » Mon Feb 03, 2020 2:48 am

tapaticmadness wrote:
Mon Feb 03, 2020 2:27 am
henry quirk wrote:
Mon Feb 03, 2020 1:49 am
tapaticmadness wrote:
Sun Feb 02, 2020 10:06 pm


I think I have never felt righteous indignation at anything or anyone. I really don't understand it.
He, Manson, was a cancer. One doesn't get indignant over a cancer.

You just cut it out.
What do you think of the Marquis de Sade? What do you think of those people into S&M?
What folks choose to do behind closed doors is their business. Bring it into the public square, however, and it's an act of memetic war. Then it should be opposed.

de Sade was a bit of a loon, yeah? A creature of perverse appetites. His reputation was three quarters self-marketing, though. Large talk, small action.

tapaticmadness
Posts: 346
Joined: Tue Jan 21, 2020 3:05 am
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Re: The Nature of Consciousness

Post by tapaticmadness » Mon Feb 03, 2020 4:08 am

henry quirk wrote:
Mon Feb 03, 2020 2:48 am
tapaticmadness wrote:
Mon Feb 03, 2020 2:27 am
henry quirk wrote:
Mon Feb 03, 2020 1:49 am


He, Manson, was a cancer. One doesn't get indignant over a cancer.

You just cut it out.
What do you think of the Marquis de Sade? What do you think of those people into S&M?
What folks choose to do behind closed doors is their business. Bring it into the public square, however, and it's an act of memetic war. Then it should be opposed.

de Sade was a bit of a loon, yeah? A creature of perverse appetites. His reputation was three quarters self-marketing, though. Large talk, small action.
Would you say that if something is out of sight that it as good as doesn't exist. Out of sight, out of mind. Don't ask, don't tell, Only things publicly accessible are real.

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henry quirk
Posts: 7697
Joined: Fri May 09, 2008 8:07 pm

Re: The Nature of Consciousness

Post by henry quirk » Mon Feb 03, 2020 4:12 am

tapaticmadness wrote:
Mon Feb 03, 2020 4:08 am
henry quirk wrote:
Mon Feb 03, 2020 2:48 am
tapaticmadness wrote:
Mon Feb 03, 2020 2:27 am


What do you think of the Marquis de Sade? What do you think of those people into S&M?
What folks choose to do behind closed doors is their business. Bring it into the public square, however, and it's an act of memetic war. Then it should be opposed.

de Sade was a bit of a loon, yeah? A creature of perverse appetites. His reputation was three quarters self-marketing, though. Large talk, small action.
Would you say that if something is out of sight that it as good as doesn't exist. Out of sight, out of mind. Don't ask, don't tell, Only things publicly accessible are real.
Not at all. Out of sight is merely private.

tapaticmadness
Posts: 346
Joined: Tue Jan 21, 2020 3:05 am
Contact:

Re: The Nature of Consciousness

Post by tapaticmadness » Mon Feb 03, 2020 4:48 am

henry quirk wrote:
Mon Feb 03, 2020 4:12 am
tapaticmadness wrote:
Mon Feb 03, 2020 4:08 am
henry quirk wrote:
Mon Feb 03, 2020 2:48 am


What folks choose to do behind closed doors is their business. Bring it into the public square, however, and it's an act of memetic war. Then it should be opposed.

de Sade was a bit of a loon, yeah? A creature of perverse appetites. His reputation was three quarters self-marketing, though. Large talk, small action.
Would you say that if something is out of sight that it as good as doesn't exist. Out of sight, out of mind. Don't ask, don't tell, Only things publicly accessible are real.
Not at all. Out of sight is merely private.
Here are a couple of excerpts from Camille Paglia, one of my favorite writers

6893 Here’s another quote from Camille Paglia’s Sexual Personae -

“Apollonian form was derived from Egypt but perfected in Greece. Coleridge says, “The Greeks idolized the finite,” while Northern Europeans have “a tendency to the infinite.” Spengler similarly identifies the modern “Faustian soul” with “pure and limitless space.” Following Nietzsche, he calls the Apollonian “the principle of visible limits” and applies it to the Greek city-state: “All that lay beyond the visual range of this political atom was alien.” The Greek statue, “the empirical visible body,” symbolizes classical reality: “the material, the optically definite, the comprehensible, the immediately present.” The Greeks were, in my phrase, visionary materialists. They saw things and persons hard and glittery, radiant with Apollonian glamour. We know the Maenadic Dionysus mainly through the impressionistic medium of Archaic vase painting. He appears in statue form only when he loses his beard and female garb and turns ephebic Olympian, in the fifth century and after. High classic Athenian culture is based on Apollonian definitiveness and externality. “The whole tendency of Greek philosophy after Plato,” remarks Gilbert Murray, “was away from the outer world towards the world of the soul.” The shift of Greek thought from outer to inner parallels the shift in art from the male to the female nude, from homosexual to heterosexual taste. Spengler says of Greek society, “What was far away, invisible, was ipso facto ‘not there’.” I cited Karen Horney’s observation that a woman cannot see her own genitals. The Greek world-view was predicated on the model of absolute outwardness of male sex organs. Athenian culture flourished in externalities, the open air of the agora and the nudity of the palestra. There are no female nudes in major fifth-century art because female sexuality was imaginatively “not there,” buried like the Furies turned Eumenides. To the old complaint that the Greeks gave their statues the genitals of little boys, one could reply that the male nude offers the whole body as a projected genital. The modestly stooping Knidian Aphrodite marks the turn toward spiritual and sexual internality. It is the end of Apollo.”


6890 Here is an excerpt from Camille Paglia’s Sexual Personae –

“The Greek principle of domination by the beautiful person as work of art is implicit in western culture, rising to view at charged historical moments. I see it in Dante and Beatrice and in Petrarch and Laura. There must be distance, of space or time. The eye elects a narcissistic personality as galvanizing object and formalizes the relation in art. The artist imposes a hieratic sexual character on the beloved, making himself the receptor (or more feminine receptacle) of the beloved’s mana. The structure is sadomasochistic. Western sexual personae are hostile with dramatic tension. Naturalistically, Beatrice’s expansion into a gigantic heavenly body is grandiose and even absurd, but she achieves her preeminence through the poet’s sexually hierarchizing western imagination. The aesthetic distance between personae is like a vacuum between poles, discharging electric tension by a bolt of lightning. Little is known of the real Beatrice and Laura. But I think they resembled the beautiful boy of homosexual tradition: they were dreamy, remote, autistic, lost in a world of androgynous self-completion. Beatrice, after all, was barely eight when Dante fell in love with her in her crimson dress. Laura’s impenetrability inspired the “fire and ice” metaphor of Petrarch’s sonnets, which revolutionized European poetry. “Fire and ice” is western alchemy. It is the chills and fever of Sappho’s and Plato’s uncanny love experience. Agonized ambivalence of body and mind was Sappho’s contribution to poetry, imitated by Catullus and transmitted to us through folk ballads and pop torch songs. Western love, Denis de Rougemont shows us, is unhappy or death-ridden. In Dante or Petrarch, self-frustrating love is not neurotic but ritualistic and conceptualizing. The west makes art and thought out of the cold manipulation of our hard sexual personae.”

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