the criminal ethics of poverty

Should you think about your duty, or about the consequences of your actions? Or should you concentrate on becoming a good person?

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Advocate
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the criminal ethics of poverty

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Can we acknowledge for good that a poor person stealing $100 from a rich person is a far less harmful offense than the reverse? $100 to a wealthy person might easily do less harm than $1 from a poor person, and it would require an obverse amount of justification. And yet, the punishment for a $100 theft is vastly more likely for a poor person and even the same punishment has a disproportionately negative impact on their lives.
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RCSaunders
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Re: the criminal ethics of poverty

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Advocate wrote: Thu May 06, 2021 4:05 pm Can we acknowledge for good that a poor person stealing $100 from a rich person is a far less harmful offense than the reverse? $100 to a wealthy person might easily do less harm than $1 from a poor person, and it would require an obverse amount of justification. And yet, the punishment for a $100 theft is vastly more likely for a poor person and even the same punishment has a disproportionately negative impact on their lives.
You should have included this in your last post on fraud. It's a good example of trying to put over the lie that poverty is innocent (though it produces nothing of value) but wealth is guilty (because it does produce something of value). The wealthy do not steal from the poor, for the obvious reason, they have nothing to steal.
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Re: the criminal ethics of poverty

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[quote=RCSaunders post_id=509988 time=1620315452 user_id=16196]
You should have included this in your last post on fraud. It's a good example of trying to put over the lie that poverty is innocent (though it produces nothing of value) but wealth is guilty (because it does produce something of value). The wealthy do not steal from the poor, for the obvious reason, they have nothing to steal.
[/quote]

You totally missed the part of reality where there's just thousands of obnoxiously wealthy people but billions for them to steal a dollar at a time from.
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RCSaunders
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Re: the criminal ethics of poverty

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Advocate wrote: Thu May 06, 2021 4:05 pm Can we acknowledge for good that a poor person stealing $100 from a rich person is a far less harmful offense than the reverse? $100 to a wealthy person might easily do less harm than $1 from a poor person, and it would require an obverse amount of justification. And yet, the punishment for a $100 theft is vastly more likely for a poor person and even the same punishment has a disproportionately negative impact on their lives.
Poverty is reality's just punishment for the sin of indolence.
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Re: the criminal ethics of poverty

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[quote=RCSaunders post_id=510058 time=1620395772 user_id=16196]
[quote=Advocate post_id=509980 time=1620313505 user_id=15238]
Can we acknowledge for good that a poor person stealing $100 from a rich person is a far less harmful offense than the reverse? $100 to a wealthy person might easily do less harm than $1 from a poor person, and it would require an obverse amount of justification. And yet, the punishment for a $100 theft is vastly more likely for a poor person and even the same punishment has a disproportionately negative impact on their lives.
[/quote]
[b][i]Poverty is reality's just punishment for the sin of indolence.
[/i][/b]
[/quote]

You missed the part of reality where working hard in a fucked up system perpetuates fuckedup-ness.
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RCSaunders
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Re: the criminal ethics of poverty

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Advocate wrote: Fri May 07, 2021 3:19 pm You missed the part of reality where working hard in a fucked up system perpetuates fuckedup-ness.
Only because I do not believe in perpetuating collectivist fictions.
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