Rarity and value

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Philosophy Explorer
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Rarity and value

Post by Philosophy Explorer » Mon Aug 06, 2018 2:20 am

If I were to do a painting, it would have its distinct style different from any other painting. But I doubt I could sell it for anything, What contributes to the value of a painting or any other work of art?

🇺🇲PhilX🇺🇲

thedoc
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Re: Rarity and value

Post by thedoc » Mon Aug 13, 2018 5:12 pm

Philosophy Explorer wrote:
Mon Aug 06, 2018 2:20 am
If I were to do a painting, it would have its distinct style different from any other painting. But I doubt I could sell it for anything, What contributes to the value of a painting or any other work of art?

🇺🇲PhilX🇺🇲
The price is what one person is willing to pay another person for the item, value is something else altogether and often relates to utility.

Ghost
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Re: Rarity and value

Post by Ghost » Fri Apr 05, 2019 5:06 pm

I think this goes along with once a celebrity is deceased their works are worth more (generally) because there will be no more produced of them. With some exceptions such as Jimi Hendrix whom still has new releases of "previously unreleased" and "remastered" creations.

I believe the value is in the rarity for the original work only, once it is reproduced/copied over and over, the value becomes diminished. Although, sometimes the copies may even be seen as more aesthetically valuable because they can edit out some minor imperfections or be a closer representation of the subject matter. Someone I know that has been to the Louvre and viewed Mona Lisa said they wished they saved their money because it is a small painting and you have to stand far away from it, and pay a lot. The google searches show a better version of the original. Any pdf of Mona Lisa that can be printed (perhaps illegally) is a better version than the original.
In this case, the true value comes from who the painter is. Names make items priceless too.
I have heard that the paintings by Adolf Hitler are the most priceless, strictly because of the historical value. Rarity too, I don't believe any are shown in any museum, although I haven't looked that up either. Not many collectors would say that those would be priceless either, because of the backlash they may receive.

If any one nameless person does a painting, it can be one of a kind, and look wonderful, but until praised around their community and farther, it won't be worth much. Unless they make a name for themselves in other avenues too, although I certainly don't advocate the way of genocide or hurting others to make history!

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Re: Rarity and value

Post by -1- » Wed Apr 24, 2019 10:16 am

Philosophy Explorer wrote:
Mon Aug 06, 2018 2:20 am
If I were to do a painting, it would have its distinct style different from any other painting. But I doubt I could sell it for anything, What contributes to the value of a painting or any other work of art?

🇺🇲PhilX🇺🇲
Value is decided by predominant colour of the painting, and the number of snow-covered mountaintops, lakes, trees, and casual swans within.

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