Music

What is art? What is beauty?

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marjoramblues
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Re: Music

Post by marjoramblues » Sun Mar 02, 2014 4:21 pm

Paul Simon - 50 ways to leave your lover
http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=298nld4Yfds
The problem is all inside your head she said to me...the answer is easy if you take it logically...
I'd like to help you in your struggle to be free...there must be 50 ways...

It's really not my habit to intrude...I hope my meaning won't be lost or misconstrued...

You don't need to discuss much...

Just drop off the key Lee
and get yourself free

It grieves me so to see you in such pain...
I wish there was something I could do to make you smile again...

Just drop off the key Lee.
To set yourself free...

Blaggard
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Re: Music

Post by Blaggard » Sun Mar 02, 2014 6:48 pm

I'm a big fan and I think both America and The Boxer are such clever songs:

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=ZO3gWIGzH3A

"She said the man in the Gaberdine suit was a spy!"

"I said be careful his bow tie is really a camera."

Apparently it's all about getting lost in the American dream, The Mid West references and so on were supposed to conjure up the idea of better times.

Love the mental imagery. :)

And I also think Bridge Over Troubled Water when sung by Art is just a bout as sublime a bit of music as I have ever heard. :)

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=jjNgn4r6SOA

Sadly ego got in the way of two very important musical talents and we no longer have them both working together, but man they were something else. :)

Incidentally no one knows who wrote Parsley, Sage, Rosemary and Thyme or Scarborough Fair, it's an old folk song but I think it is performed remarkably, it's not easy to cover folk music, and I think they kinda nailed it and I would rather be a hammer than a nail. ;)

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=WB8yAoVuLko

Apparently Bridge Over Troubled Water the album was the third biggest selling album of the seventies it got beat out by Saturday Night Fever, The Bee Gees magnum opus though so I don't feel all that upset. Let's face it Disco was pretty big then. ;) :)

Pluto
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Re: Music

Post by Pluto » Fri Mar 14, 2014 8:16 pm


thedoc
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Re: Music

Post by thedoc » Sun Mar 23, 2014 2:02 am

Just listened to Beethoven's 'Moonlight Sonata' 1st and 2nd movements, and 'Clair De Lune', played on my piano.

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SpheresOfBalance
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Re: Music

Post by SpheresOfBalance » Mon Mar 24, 2014 9:46 pm

Blaggard wrote:I'm a big fan and I think both America and The Boxer are such clever songs:

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=ZO3gWIGzH3A

Yes did a pretty good COVER if one's a Yes fan such as myself.

"She said the man in the Gaberdine suit was a spy!"

"I said be careful his bow tie is really a camera."

Apparently it's all about getting lost in the American dream, The Mid West references and so on were supposed to conjure up the idea of better times.

Love the mental imagery. :)

And I also think Bridge Over Troubled Water when sung by Art is just a bout as sublime a bit of music as I have ever heard. :)

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=jjNgn4r6SOA

Sadly ego got in the way of two very important musical talents and we no longer have them both working together, but man they were something else. :)

Incidentally no one knows who wrote Parsley, Sage, Rosemary and Thyme or Scarborough Fair, it's an old folk song but I think it is performed remarkably, it's not easy to cover folk music, and I think they kinda nailed it and I would rather be a hammer than a nail. ;)

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=WB8yAoVuLko

Apparently Bridge Over Troubled Water the album was the third biggest selling album of the seventies it got beat out by Saturday Night Fever, The Bee Gees magnum opus though so I don't feel all that upset. Let's face it Disco was pretty big then. ;) :)

Blaggard
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Re: Music

Post by Blaggard » Mon Mar 24, 2014 9:54 pm

Yes did a pretty good COVER if one's a Yes fan such as myself.
Both The Boxer and America were written by Paul Simon, I am not sure I see your point?

Are you trying to say by magic Yes (very good prog rock incidentally) magically went back in time and wrote two songs that are Simon's work?

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SpheresOfBalance
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Re: Music

Post by SpheresOfBalance » Tue Mar 25, 2014 12:02 am

Some notable Guitarists.

Acoustic/Classical Guitar:

Solo, as it's all that's needed: Di Meola

Because innovation is required: Mongrain

Arguably the guy that popularized the style (RIP): Hedges

Electric:

The Dreamer: Petrucci

The Shredder: Malmsteen

Let's all say Blues...

Just Jimi (RIP): Hendrix

Just Stevie (RIP): Ray Vaughan

Just a few...


Actually I'd be hard pressed to name a top 10. And of course Clapton belongs in there somewhere!

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SpheresOfBalance
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Re: Music

Post by SpheresOfBalance » Tue Mar 25, 2014 8:42 am

Blaggard wrote:
Yes did a pretty good COVER if one's a Yes fan such as myself.
Both The Boxer and America were written by Paul Simon, I am not sure I see your point?

Are you trying to say by magic Yes (very good prog rock incidentally) magically went back in time and wrote two songs that are Simon's work?
No! To say one does a "cover" is musician jargon, to say that someone did a remake. The word "COVER" above is a link to a youtube video (stills) of the Yes "cover" of America, if the link had been taken, the fact would have been apparent, I'm sure.

There are youtube links in my post above, as well, if you care to check them out. It was for you that I posted, however all are welcome, of course!
;-)

Blaggard
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Re: Music

Post by Blaggard » Tue Mar 25, 2014 9:05 pm

SpheresOfBalance wrote:
Blaggard wrote:
Yes did a pretty good COVER if one's a Yes fan such as myself.
Both The Boxer and America were written by Paul Simon, I am not sure I see your point?

Are you trying to say by magic Yes (very good prog rock incidentally) magically went back in time and wrote two songs that are Simon's work?
No! To say one does a "cover" is musician jargon, to say that someone did a remake. The word "COVER" above is a link to a youtube video (stills) of the Yes "cover" of America, if the link had been taken, the fact would have been apparent, I'm sure.

There are youtube links in my post above, as well, if you care to check them out. It was for you that I posted, however all are welcome, of course!
;-)
Ah ok my bad I misconstrued what you meant, I do that a lot. ;)

Looking back it's clear what you meant: brain fart. :S
Actually I'd be hard pressed to name a top 10 at least. And of course Clapton belongs in there somewhere!
Definitely I posted some of his work on the other music thread.

I'd also put Yngwee Malmsteen in the top 20 and Brian May from queen, they both have a sublime touch when it comes to the electric guitar. Gary Moore also has an incredible talent.

Gary Moore: wiki
Changing bands

In Dublin, Moore joined the group Skid Row with Noel Bridgeman and Brendan "Brush" Shiels. It was with this group that he earned a reputation in the music industry, and his association with Phil Lynott began.[4]

In 1970, Moore moved to England and remained there, apart from two short periods in the United States. In 1973, under the moniker "The Gary Moore Band" he released his first solo album in 1973, Grinding Stone . "Grinding Stone" was issued in North America on Neil Kempfer-Stocker's fledgling record label imprint Cosmos and received "Album of the Year" accolades on KTAC-FM/Seattle-Tacoma, Washington in 1974.

In 1974 he re-joined Lynott, when he first joined Thin Lizzy after the departure of founding member Eric Bell.

From 1975 to August 1978, he was a member of Colosseum II. With the band he also collaborated with Andrew Lloyd Webber on the composer's Variations album in 1978.

In 1977, Moore re-joined Thin Lizzy, first as a temporary replacement for Brian Robertson, and on a permanent basis a year later.
Yngwee Malmsteen: wiki
Yngwie Johan Malmsteen (/ˈɪŋveɪ ˈmɑːlmstiːn/ ING-vay MAHLM-steen; born Lars Johan Yngve Lannerbäck on 30 June 1963) is a Swedish guitarist, songwriter, multi-instrumentalist and bandleader. Malmsteen became known for his neo-classical playing style in heavy metal. According to Steve Huey of Allmusic, "Yngwie Malmsteen is arguably the most technically accomplished hard rock guitarist to emerge during the '80s."[2]
Brian May: wiki
Brian May has been referred to as a virtuoso guitarist by many publications and musicians.[59][60][61][62][63] He has featured in various music polls of great rock guitarists, and in 2011 was ranked number 26 on Rolling Stone magazine's list of the "100 Greatest Guitarists of All Time".[6] Former Van Halen vocalist Sammy Hagar stated, "I thought Queen were really innovative and made some great sounding records.. I like the rockin' stuff. I think Brian May has one of the great guitar tones on the planet, and I really, really love his guitar work."[63] May mainly used the "Red Special", which he designed when he was only 16 years old.[64] It was built with wood from an 18th century fireplace. His comments on the guitar:

"I like a big neck – thick, flat and wide. I lacquered the fingerboard with Rustin's Plastic Coating. The tremolo is interesting in that the arm's made from an old bicycle saddle bag carrier, the knob at the end's off a knitting needle and the springs are valve springs from an old motorbike."
—Brian May[65]

In addition to using his home-made guitar he prefers to use coins (especially a sixpence from the farewell proof set of 1970), instead of a more traditional plastic plectrum, on the basis that their rigidity gives him more control in playing.[66] He is known to carry coins in his pockets specifically for this purpose.[66]

May's early influences were Cliff Richard and the Shadows, who he says were "the most metallic thing(s) out at the time." Many years later he gained his opportunity to play on separate occasions with both Cliff Richard and Shadows lead guitarist Hank Marvin. He has collaborated with Cliff Richard on a re-recording of the Cliff Richard and The Shadows (then known as The Drifters) 1958 hit "Move It" on the Cliff Richard duets album Two's Company which was released on 6 November 2006.[67] On Queen For An Hour 1989 Interview on BBC Radio 1, May listed Jimi Hendrix, Jeff Beck and Eric Clapton as his guitar heroes. In a 1991 interview for Guitar World magazine, May referred to the Who as "my inspiration", and on seeing Led Zeppelin stated, "We used to look at those guys and think, "That's the way it should be done."[68] Influenced by Jimmy Page, May states; "I don't think anyone has epitomised riff writing better than Jimmy Page – he's one of the great brains of rock music".[69][70]

During the time in which May and his father were building the Red Special, May also produced plans to build a second guitar. However, so successful was the Red Special, that May had no need to build another guitar.[71] These plans were eventually given to guitar luthier Andrew Guyton in around 2004/05, some slight modifications were made and the guitar was built. It was named "The Spade", as the shape of the body resembled the form shown on playing cards. However the guitar also came to be known as "The Guitar That Time Forgot".[71]

Lifestyle Business
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Re: Music

Post by Lifestyle Business » Tue Mar 25, 2014 9:29 pm

I might be on my own here, but I find that ambient, downtempo music is to my liking these days. There are people like Keith Kenniff, whose exploration of soundscapes I find sublime.

Blaggard
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Re: Music

Post by Blaggard » Tue Mar 25, 2014 9:34 pm

Lifestyle Business wrote:I might be on my own here, but I find that ambient, downtempo music is to my liking these days. There are people like Keith Kenniff, whose exploration of soundscapes I find sublime.
You might but post a link to a youtube video so we can decide for ourselves. :P

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SpheresOfBalance
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Re: Music

Post by SpheresOfBalance » Wed Mar 26, 2014 3:18 am

Blaggard wrote:
Yes did a pretty good COVER, if one's a Yes fan, such as myself.
Blaggard wrote:
SpheresOfBalance wrote:
Both The Boxer and America were written by Paul Simon, I am not sure I see your point?

Are you trying to say by magic Yes (very good prog rock incidentally) magically went back in time and wrote two songs that are Simon's work?
No! To say one does a "cover" is musician jargon, to say that someone did a remake. The word "COVER" above is a link to a youtube video (stills) of the Yes "cover" of America, if the link had been taken, the fact would have been apparent, I'm sure.

There are youtube links in my post above, as well, if you care to check them out. It was for you that I posted, however all are welcome, of course!
;-)
Ah ok my bad I misconstrued what you meant, I do that a lot. ;)

Looking back it's clear what you meant: brain fart. :S
I left out some commas that would have made it clearer, I corrected it above, first quote, but we all do that don't we? I know I do! And it gets worse with age, you lucky dog you, wish I was your age, better yet, want to go back and be 17 again, knowing what I now know. ;-)

Actually I'd be hard pressed to name a top 10 at least. And of course Clapton belongs in there somewhere!
Definitely I posted some of his work on the other music thread.

I'd also put Yngwee Malmsteen in the top 20 and Brian May from queen, they both have a sublime touch when it comes to the electric guitar. Gary Moore also has an incredible talent.

Gary Moore: wiki
Changing bands

In Dublin, Moore joined the group Skid Row with Noel Bridgeman and Brendan "Brush" Shiels. It was with this group that he earned a reputation in the music industry, and his association with Phil Lynott began.[4]

In 1970, Moore moved to England and remained there, apart from two short periods in the United States. In 1973, under the moniker "The Gary Moore Band" he released his first solo album in 1973, Grinding Stone . "Grinding Stone" was issued in North America on Neil Kempfer-Stocker's fledgling record label imprint Cosmos and received "Album of the Year" accolades on KTAC-FM/Seattle-Tacoma, Washington in 1974.

In 1974 he re-joined Lynott, when he first joined Thin Lizzy after the departure of founding member Eric Bell.

From 1975 to August 1978, he was a member of Colosseum II. With the band he also collaborated with Andrew Lloyd Webber on the composer's Variations album in 1978.

In 1977, Moore re-joined Thin Lizzy, first as a temporary replacement for Brian Robertson, and on a permanent basis a year later.
Yngwee Malmsteen: wiki
Yngwie Johan Malmsteen (/ˈɪŋveɪ ˈmɑːlmstiːn/ ING-vay MAHLM-steen; born Lars Johan Yngve Lannerbäck on 30 June 1963) is a Swedish guitarist, songwriter, multi-instrumentalist and bandleader. Malmsteen became known for his neo-classical playing style in heavy metal. According to Steve Huey of Allmusic, "Yngwie Malmsteen is arguably the most technically accomplished hard rock guitarist to emerge during the '80s."[2]
Brian May: wiki
Brian May has been referred to as a virtuoso guitarist by many publications and musicians.[59][60][61][62][63] He has featured in various music polls of great rock guitarists, and in 2011 was ranked number 26 on Rolling Stone magazine's list of the "100 Greatest Guitarists of All Time".[6] Former Van Halen vocalist Sammy Hagar stated, "I thought Queen were really innovative and made some great sounding records.. I like the rockin' stuff. I think Brian May has one of the great guitar tones on the planet, and I really, really love his guitar work."[63] May mainly used the "Red Special", which he designed when he was only 16 years old.[64] It was built with wood from an 18th century fireplace. His comments on the guitar:

"I like a big neck – thick, flat and wide. I lacquered the fingerboard with Rustin's Plastic Coating. The tremolo is interesting in that the arm's made from an old bicycle saddle bag carrier, the knob at the end's off a knitting needle and the springs are valve springs from an old motorbike."
—Brian May[65]

In addition to using his home-made guitar he prefers to use coins (especially a sixpence from the farewell proof set of 1970), instead of a more traditional plastic plectrum, on the basis that their rigidity gives him more control in playing.[66] He is known to carry coins in his pockets specifically for this purpose.[66]

May's early influences were Cliff Richard and the Shadows, who he says were "the most metallic thing(s) out at the time." Many years later he gained his opportunity to play on separate occasions with both Cliff Richard and Shadows lead guitarist Hank Marvin. He has collaborated with Cliff Richard on a re-recording of the Cliff Richard and The Shadows (then known as The Drifters) 1958 hit "Move It" on the Cliff Richard duets album Two's Company which was released on 6 November 2006.[67] On Queen For An Hour 1989 Interview on BBC Radio 1, May listed Jimi Hendrix, Jeff Beck and Eric Clapton as his guitar heroes. In a 1991 interview for Guitar World magazine, May referred to the Who as "my inspiration", and on seeing Led Zeppelin stated, "We used to look at those guys and think, "That's the way it should be done."[68] Influenced by Jimmy Page, May states; "I don't think anyone has epitomised riff writing better than Jimmy Page – he's one of the great brains of rock music".[69][70]

During the time in which May and his father were building the Red Special, May also produced plans to build a second guitar. However, so successful was the Red Special, that May had no need to build another guitar.[71] These plans were eventually given to guitar luthier Andrew Guyton in around 2004/05, some slight modifications were made and the guitar was built. It was named "The Spade", as the shape of the body resembled the form shown on playing cards. However the guitar also came to be known as "The Guitar That Time Forgot".[71]
As time unfolds, I see that we probably have a lot more in common than we now realize, at least with each post I see more and more common ground. Love Brian May's sound and touch, he uses an English coin to pick, (non flexible) do you know how tough that is? As you said more control, yet requiring even more minutely refined dexterity, extreme minute articulation.

I'm not a huge blues fan, I know, no need to rip me a new one, I profess to love Rock, yet I say I don't like blues much, such hypocrisy! ;-) But my excuse is that, I lean more towards Jazz and Classical, especially as it pertains to Progressive Rock, my absolute favorite genre. Why? Because I prefer complicated music. The more counterpoint and syncopation combined with awesome harmonies, melodies and rhythms and an ever varying time signature, makes me a happy camper. Where it's a challenge to hear all the subtle intricacies, and with each listen one finds fresh nuances, different avenues to explore. To me this type music truly stands the test of time. Don't get me wrong, I am capable of ascertaining that which it takes to make for an awesome blues guitarist, which is why I own one Gary Moore CD, as well as Hendrix, as well as many other Rock bands that have blues influenced guitarists, unfortunately, I have no Stevie Ray V CD's, though I've seem him perform and WOW, he's great!!! So what do you think of Steve Morse on guitar or maybe Jan Akkerman, how about Lee Ritenour, John McLaughlin or Paco de Lucía, or maybe Neil Schon, Steve Howe, or Rik Emmett? Not to forget about Steve Vai, Joe Satriani or Eric Johnson? Just to name a few. So I'd be hard pressed to pick a top ten, indeed!!!!

Lifestyle Business
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Re: Music

Post by Lifestyle Business » Wed Mar 26, 2014 3:12 pm

As requested...here's a sample of Keith Kenniff's music...(aka Helios)

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=ohj6p4EcsR0

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Hjarloprillar
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Re: Music

Post by Hjarloprillar » Wed Apr 02, 2014 9:44 am

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=IfRY3SsozuM

thank your god. I was not there

Ansiktsburk
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Re: Music

Post by Ansiktsburk » Sun Apr 06, 2014 7:59 am

Can't you embed your youtubes here in some way?

Anyhow, here is a cool new-ish visualization of an old Predenders favorite of mine from annudazumal.
http://youtu.be/0huPnNi6ZhQ

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