What is the point of Higher Education?

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owl of Minerva
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Re: What is the point of Higher Education?

Post by owl of Minerva »

Sculptor wrote: Tue Jan 25, 2022 5:55 pm
owl of Minerva wrote: Tue Jan 25, 2022 5:51 pm I fell off the orthodoxy bandwagon some time ago and never got back on. The orthodoxy of capitalism, the orthodoxy of socialism, the orthodoxy of this diet or that diet.

We should use our intelligence and discrimination to separate the wheat from the chaff. More often than not it is all chaff. It is possible to live without being on board with any of it. There are alternatives to the industrial/military complex, this ideology or that ideology, to a sociobiology style version; human-style dominance of primate fighting primate, ‘Isms’ are likely to prevail with their captors, unfortunately.

If one is willing to live under the radar, a good life is possible in spite of all of it. ‘Isms’ likely have to run their course, be tested and found wanting, until evolution reaches an apex. Without an apex it is turtles all the way down.
The difference between living wiht and accepting the situation on one hand and and pretending it does not exist, is the same as the differnece between bending over and lying down.
Whatever. Better than being captured by an ideology which always benefits more those who use and manipulate it than it does those who are captured by it; caught in its net.
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attofishpi
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Re: What is the point of Higher Education?

Post by attofishpi »

I read Animal Farm as a youngster, from memory I think it suggested that eventually we will be owned by a pig called Xi Jinping Pong.
promethean75
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Re: What is the point of Higher Education?

Post by promethean75 »

"they decided to make everyone shareholders of the company, and hey presto - the business is back to success. It makes sense, one can imagine employees contemplating ways to make the business more efficient - skilled workers from all facets of the business would be considering their own work routine and ways improve, and everyone would be open to discuss such things. It should be a standard model for all businesses."

Excellent. More of you must become hungry like the Wolff...
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Sculptor
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Re: What is the point of Higher Education?

Post by Sculptor »

attofishpi wrote: Wed Jan 26, 2022 12:12 am I read Animal Farm as a youngster, from memory I think it suggested that eventually we will be owned by a pig called Xi Jinping Pong.
No we are owned by a pig called Boris Johnson.
owl of Minerva
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Re: What is the point of Higher Education?

Post by owl of Minerva »

Many CEO’s are not very bright. They do well in an educational system that is mostly input and output; regurgitating what is taught without assimilation. The use of discriminative intelligence is not encouraged; making a contribution of their own to the topic. Consequently they hire consultants for dumb things like time and motion studies, wasting money that could be put to better use.

Creative thinking requires effort, even in science the transition to a new way of seeing is fraught with danger for those whose experiments challenge the status quo. Vitalism being one example. The church, getting past paganism, saw it as occultism and guarded against it, ready to punish anyone who crossed the line. Life was material body, and soul. Science inherited that stance, when it became secular it was just body.

The nineteenth century saw any notion of vitalism as quackery. In the early 20th century there were experiments on the role of electricity and electromagnetism in forms. Magnetism itself was too much of an unknown and still is, more abstract than real. Mechanism grew out of Aristotle’s less speculative rationalism, which held that universal principles were not real, being merely the names given to humanity’s attempts at making sense of the reality apprehended through the senses. Consequently the mechanism perspective took hold in both philosophy and science up to Newton. Aristotle’s perspective still holds in relation to abstract ideas, although the mechanism perspective it induced has waned.

For health, the status of the body’s kinetic energy can be assessed by one who has specialized in it. All else is bandaids.
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Sculptor
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Re: What is the point of Higher Education?

Post by Sculptor »

owl of Minerva wrote: Wed Jan 26, 2022 3:28 pm Many CEO’s are not very bright. They do well in an educational system that is mostly input and output; regurgitating what is taught without assimilation. The use of discriminative intelligence is not encouraged; making a contribution of their own to the topic. Consequently they hire consultants for dumb things like time and motion studies, wasting money that could be put to better use.
A CEO has to be smart enough to delegate the hard work to another person.
Look at Trump - a man of severely limited intelligence.
Creative thinking requires effort, even in science the transition to a new way of seeing is fraught with danger for those whose experiments challenge the status quo. Vitalism being one example. The church, getting past paganism, saw it as occultism and guarded against it, ready to punish anyone who crossed the line. Life was material body, and soul. Science inherited that stance, when it became secular it was just body.
Justinian was the last nail in the coffin of scientific and philosophical progress when he closed the Scools of Athens, and dropped Christian Europe into an intellecual dark age.

The nineteenth century saw any notion of vitalism as quackery. In the early 20th century there were experiments on the role of electricity and electromagnetism in forms. Magnetism itself was too much of an unknown and still is, more abstract than real. Mechanism grew out of Aristotle’s less speculative rationalism, which held that universal principles were not real, being merely the names given to humanity’s attempts at making sense of the reality apprehended through the senses. Consequently the mechanism perspective took hold in both philosophy and science up to Newton. Aristotle’s perspective still holds in relation to abstract ideas, although the mechanism perspective it induced has waned.

For health, the status of the body’s kinetic energy can be assessed by one who has specialized in it. All else is bandaids.
owl of Minerva
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Re: What is the point of Higher Education?

Post by owl of Minerva »

owl of Minerva wrote: Wed Jan 26, 2022 3:28 pm Many CEO’s are not very bright. They do well in an educational system that is mostly input and output; regurgitating what is taught without assimilation. The use of discriminative intelligence is not encouraged; making a contribution of their own to the topic. Consequently they hire consultants for dumb things like time and motion studies, wasting money that could be put to better use.

Creative thinking requires effort, even in science the transition to a new way of seeing is fraught with danger for those whose experiments challenge the status quo. Vitalism being one example. The church, getting past paganism, saw it as occultism and guarded against it, ready to punish anyone who crossed the line. Life was material body, and soul. Science inherited that stance, when it became secular it was just body.

The nineteenth century saw any notion of vitalism as quackery. In the early 20th century there were experiments on the role of electricity and electromagnetism in forms. Magnetism itself was too much of an unknown and still is, more abstract than real. Mechanism grew out of Aristotle’s less speculative rationalism, which held that universal principles were not real, being merely the names given to humanity’s attempts at making sense of the reality apprehended through the senses. Consequently the mechanism perspective took hold in both philosophy and science up to Newton. Aristotle’s perspective still holds in relation to abstract ideas, although the mechanism perspective it induced has waned.

For health, the status of the body’s kinetic energy can be assessed by one who has specialized in it. All else is bandaids.
The Dark Ages were a problem. One account has them extending from 700 B.C. to 1700 A.D., during which all that was perceived was matter. The Greeks, ancient and classical, up to 700 B.C. had one perspective on reality. Logos as intelligence ruled all and Nous human reason was one in perception until Aristotle, after 700 B.C, divided perception as reason into passive and active. Abstract ideas: passive reason, was not representative of anything, only the material world, what could actually be experienced, was real, a perspective with which Hume could agree. That created a divide which still persists in philosophy and other disciplines as well. It is the case that everything in philosophy since is just a footnote to Plato, with his cosmic blueprint of forms: idea and template.
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Sculptor
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Re: What is the point of Higher Education?

Post by Sculptor »

owl of Minerva wrote: Thu Jan 27, 2022 2:35 pm
owl of Minerva wrote: Wed Jan 26, 2022 3:28 pm Many CEO’s are not very bright. They do well in an educational system that is mostly input and output; regurgitating what is taught without assimilation. The use of discriminative intelligence is not encouraged; making a contribution of their own to the topic. Consequently they hire consultants for dumb things like time and motion studies, wasting money that could be put to better use.

Creative thinking requires effort, even in science the transition to a new way of seeing is fraught with danger for those whose experiments challenge the status quo. Vitalism being one example. The church, getting past paganism, saw it as occultism and guarded against it, ready to punish anyone who crossed the line. Life was material body, and soul. Science inherited that stance, when it became secular it was just body.

The nineteenth century saw any notion of vitalism as quackery. In the early 20th century there were experiments on the role of electricity and electromagnetism in forms. Magnetism itself was too much of an unknown and still is, more abstract than real. Mechanism grew out of Aristotle’s less speculative rationalism, which held that universal principles were not real, being merely the names given to humanity’s attempts at making sense of the reality apprehended through the senses. Consequently the mechanism perspective took hold in both philosophy and science up to Newton. Aristotle’s perspective still holds in relation to abstract ideas, although the mechanism perspective it induced has waned.

For health, the status of the body’s kinetic energy can be assessed by one who has specialized in it. All else is bandaids.
The Dark Ages were a problem. One account has them extending from 700 B.C. to 1700 A.D., during which all that was perceived was matter. The Greeks, ancient and classical, up to 700 B.C. had one perspective on reality. Logos as intelligence ruled all and Nous human reason was one in perception until Aristotle, after 700 B.C, divided perception as reason into passive and active. Abstract ideas: passive reason, was not representative of anything, only the material world, what could actually be experienced, was real, a perspective with which Hume could agree. That created a divide which still persists in philosophy and other disciplines as well. It is the case that everything in philosophy since is just a footnote to Plato, with his cosmic blueprint of forms: idea and template.
You are confused about yout dating.
There are several two main dark ages in Europe. The start of the first is maked from the fall of the Mycenean Bronze age civilisation and the start of the Iron Age to the emergence of the Greek City State c 1200 - 600 bce.
The next and distinct dark age was from the fall of Rome circa 400ce, or later depending on where you are in Europe to the beginning of the medieval world circa 1000ce.
Where on earth you get 1700AD from I have no idea.
I'd love to know where you get these ridiculous dates, and what you think is meant by "dark age".
Please cite your "on account".
owl of Minerva
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Re: What is the point of Higher Education?

Post by owl of Minerva »

owl of Minerva wrote: Thu Jan 27, 2022 2:35 pm
owl of Minerva wrote: Wed Jan 26, 2022 3:28 pm Many CEO’s are not very bright. They do well in an educational system that is mostly input and output; regurgitating what is taught without assimilation. The use of discriminative intelligence is not encouraged; making a contribution of their own to the topic. Consequently they hire consultants for dumb things like time and motion studies, wasting money that could be put to better use.

Creative thinking requires effort, even in science the transition to a new way of seeing is fraught with danger for those whose experiments challenge the status quo. Vitalism being one example. The church, getting past paganism, saw it as occultism and guarded against it, ready to punish anyone who crossed the line. Life was material body, and soul. Science inherited that stance, when it became secular it was just body.

The nineteenth century saw any notion of vitalism as quackery. In the early 20th century there were experiments on the role of electricity and electromagnetism in forms. Magnetism itself was too much of an unknown and still is, more abstract than real. Mechanism grew out of Aristotle’s less speculative rationalism, which held that universal principles were not real, being merely the names given to humanity’s attempts at making sense of the reality apprehended through the senses. Consequently the mechanism perspective took hold in both philosophy and science up to Newton. Aristotle’s perspective still holds in relation to abstract ideas, although the mechanism perspective it induced has waned.

For health, the status of the body’s kinetic energy can be assessed by one who has specialized in it. All else is bandaids.
The Dark Ages were a problem. One account has them extending from 700 B.C. to 1700 A.D., during which all that was perceived was matter. The Greeks, ancient and classical, up to 700 B.C. had one perspective on reality. Logos as intelligence ruled all and Nous human reason was one in perception until Aristotle, after 700 B.C, divided perception as reason into passive and active. Abstract ideas: passive reason, was not representative of anything, only the material world, what could actually be experienced, was real, a perspective with which Hume could agree. That created a divide which still persists in philosophy and other disciplines as well. It is the case that everything in philosophy since is just a footnote to Plato, with his cosmic blueprint of forms: idea and template.
I do not have an affinity for any one version of the Dark Ages. The one I cited is from Eastern philosophy where the causality of the rise and fall of Ages is perceived as Celestial. Based on resonance, much as astronomy today notes resonance between planetary bodies as having played a role in the planetary evolution of the galaxy. If it were the case the effect would be planet wide not one area rising whilst another is falling.

There is also the textbook version, just verified, which has the Dark Age in the West from ca 29 to the Middle Ages, somewhere prior or close to 1150 ce and the Founding of the University of Paris.

Your version has two Dark Ages occurring in what Eastern philosophy would perceive a one arc of the Precession of the Equinoxes, in total 24,000 years. The Western version is slightly longer and has equal amounts of time for each Age, whereas in the Eastern version the length of each of the Ages differ; gold, silver, bronze, iron. If we can imagine a 24,000 year clock with the longest Age at the top, the shortest at the bottom. Each Age occurring twice within the cycle, descending in the 12,000 downward arc and as ascending in the 12, 000 upward arc. The top Age approximately 12,000 bce the bottom Age, iron or Dark, the lowest or mid-point as 499 ce.

That two Dark Ages would occur in such close proximity as you cite is open to question. The Eastern version and the textbook version has it as one Age that ends, not occurring twice within the span of ancient, medieval or modern history. Its descent to the lowest point turning into an ascent that leads into the following Age. The Dark Ages not being two but one, descent and ascent.
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Immanuel Can
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Re: What is the point of Higher Education?

Post by Immanuel Can »

"What is the point in Higher Education?"

In regards to the Humanities are related subjects, there used to be a point: the introduction of young thinkers to the Great Tradition of Western Thought and of world alternatives, so as to create the independent, critical thinking, liberal person.

There is now no point. And the reason is the taking-over of these subjects by Neo-Marxist indoctrinators, the backgrounding and elimination of the Great Tradition, the replacement of personal critical thinking with supine and obsequious repetition of Critical Theory dogma and the inculcation of subordination of the liberal individual conscience to the goals of the collective.

Nowadays, liberal education is just the mistake of paying to have your children indoctrinated in Leftist political ideology, and turned into little racists and whiners who have no concept of the past (nor any use for it) and no vision for the future but whatever they have been taught by their indoctrinators.

Send your kids to apprenticeship or professional programs. Save your money, and their minds.
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Sculptor
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Re: What is the point of Higher Education?

Post by Sculptor »

owl of Minerva wrote: Fri Jan 28, 2022 2:47 pm
owl of Minerva wrote: Thu Jan 27, 2022 2:35 pm
owl of Minerva wrote: Wed Jan 26, 2022 3:28 pm Many CEO’s are not very bright. They do well in an educational system that is mostly input and output; regurgitating what is taught without assimilation. The use of discriminative intelligence is not encouraged; making a contribution of their own to the topic. Consequently they hire consultants for dumb things like time and motion studies, wasting money that could be put to better use.

Creative thinking requires effort, even in science the transition to a new way of seeing is fraught with danger for those whose experiments challenge the status quo. Vitalism being one example. The church, getting past paganism, saw it as occultism and guarded against it, ready to punish anyone who crossed the line. Life was material body, and soul. Science inherited that stance, when it became secular it was just body.

The nineteenth century saw any notion of vitalism as quackery. In the early 20th century there were experiments on the role of electricity and electromagnetism in forms. Magnetism itself was too much of an unknown and still is, more abstract than real. Mechanism grew out of Aristotle’s less speculative rationalism, which held that universal principles were not real, being merely the names given to humanity’s attempts at making sense of the reality apprehended through the senses. Consequently the mechanism perspective took hold in both philosophy and science up to Newton. Aristotle’s perspective still holds in relation to abstract ideas, although the mechanism perspective it induced has waned.

For health, the status of the body’s kinetic energy can be assessed by one who has specialized in it. All else is bandaids.
The Dark Ages were a problem. One account has them extending from 700 B.C. to 1700 A.D., during which all that was perceived was matter. The Greeks, ancient and classical, up to 700 B.C. had one perspective on reality. Logos as intelligence ruled all and Nous human reason was one in perception until Aristotle, after 700 B.C, divided perception as reason into passive and active. Abstract ideas: passive reason, was not representative of anything, only the material world, what could actually be experienced, was real, a perspective with which Hume could agree. That created a divide which still persists in philosophy and other disciplines as well. It is the case that everything in philosophy since is just a footnote to Plato, with his cosmic blueprint of forms: idea and template.
I do not have an affinity for any one version of the Dark Ages. The one I cited is from Eastern philosophy where the causality of the rise and fall of Ages is perceived as Celestial. Based on resonance, much as astronomy today notes resonance between planetary bodies as having played a role in the planetary evolution of the galaxy. If it were the case the effect would be planet wide not one area rising whilst another is falling.

There is also the textbook version, just verified, which has the Dark Age in the West from ca 29 to the Middle Ages, somewhere prior or close to 1150 ce and the Founding of the University of Paris.

Your version has two Dark Ages occurring in what Eastern philosophy would perceive a one arc of the Precession of the Equinoxes, in total 24,000 years. The Western version is slightly longer and has equal amounts of time for each Age, whereas in the Eastern version the length of each of the Ages differ; gold, silver, bronze, iron. If we can imagine a 24,000 year clock with the longest Age at the top, the shortest at the bottom. Each Age occurring twice within the cycle, descending in the 12,000 downward arc and as ascending in the 12, 000 upward arc. The top Age approximately 12,000 bce the bottom Age, iron or Dark, the lowest or mid-point as 499 ce.

That two Dark Ages would occur in such close proximity as you cite is open to question. The Eastern version and the textbook version has it as one Age that ends, not occurring twice within the span of ancient, medieval or modern history. Its descent to the lowest point turning into an ascent that leads into the following Age. The Dark Ages not being two but one, descent and ascent.
One account has them extending from 700 B.C. to 1700 A.D.

Please cite your source.
And what do you think "Dark Age" means?
owl of Minerva
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Re: What is the point of Higher Education?

Post by owl of Minerva »

Sculptor wrote: Fri Jan 28, 2022 7:36 pm
owl of Minerva wrote: Fri Jan 28, 2022 2:47 pm
owl of Minerva wrote: Thu Jan 27, 2022 2:35 pm

The Dark Ages were a problem. One account has them extending from 700 B.C. to 1700 A.D., during which all that was perceived was matter. The Greeks, ancient and classical, up to 700 B.C. had one perspective on reality. Logos as intelligence ruled all and Nous human reason was one in perception until Aristotle, after 700 B.C, divided perception as reason into passive and active. Abstract ideas: passive reason, was not representative of anything, only the material world, what could actually be experienced, was real, a perspective with which Hume could agree. That created a divide which still persists in philosophy and other disciplines as well. It is the case that everything in philosophy since is just a footnote to Plato, with his cosmic blueprint of forms: idea and template.
I do not have an affinity for any one version of the Dark Ages. The one I cited is from Eastern philosophy where the causality of the rise and fall of Ages is perceived as Celestial. Based on resonance, much as astronomy today notes resonance between planetary bodies as having played a role in the planetary evolution of the galaxy. If it were the case the effect would be planet wide not one area rising whilst another is falling.

There is also the textbook version, just verified, which has the Dark Age in the West from ca 29 to the Middle Ages, somewhere prior or close to 1150 ce and the Founding of the University of Paris.

Your version has two Dark Ages occurring in what Eastern philosophy would perceive a one arc of the Precession of the Equinoxes, in total 24,000 years. The Western version is slightly longer and has equal amounts of time for each Age, whereas in the Eastern version the length of each of the Ages differ; gold, silver, bronze, iron. If we can imagine a 24,000 year clock with the longest Age at the top, the shortest at the bottom. Each Age occurring twice within the cycle, descending in the 12,000 downward arc and as ascending in the 12, 000 upward arc. The top Age approximately 12,000 bce the bottom Age, iron or Dark, the lowest or mid-point as 499 ce.

That two Dark Ages would occur in such close proximity as you cite is open to question. The Eastern version and the textbook version has it as one Age that ends, not occurring twice within the span of ancient, medieval or modern history. Its descent to the lowest point turning into an ascent that leads into the following Age. The Dark Ages not being two but one, descent and ascent.
One account has them extending from 700 B.C. to 1700 A.D.

Please cite your source.
And what do you think "Dark Age" means?
My source was a lecture I attended as a guest, I do not recall the name of the person who was versed in oriental astronomy, and addressed the topic as a mistake that crept into almanacs for the first time from calculations made around 700 bce that had The Dark Ages lasting for 432,000 years.

A cycle of 24,000 years with the Ages calculated to fit that time frame was presented as what prevailed prior to the miscalculation. It made more sense than 432,000 years. The duration of the Dark Ages were calculated to be 2400 years, 1200 prior to and 1200 after 499 ce, its lowest point. The documentary ‘The Great Year’ also refers to a 24,000 year cycle, although it does not mention the duration of the Ages.

Do you have a source for your version. It appears unlikely that the a Dark Age would end and then reoccur within the time frame you mentioned.

The Dark Ages is what is generally perceived as an era of economic, intellectual, and cultural decline. A material age prior to the discoveries of electricity and inner forces.
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Sculptor
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Re: What is the point of Higher Education?

Post by Sculptor »

owl of Minerva wrote: Sat Jan 29, 2022 3:21 am
Sculptor wrote: Fri Jan 28, 2022 7:36 pm
owl of Minerva wrote: Fri Jan 28, 2022 2:47 pm

I do not have an affinity for any one version of the Dark Ages. The one I cited is from Eastern philosophy where the causality of the rise and fall of Ages is perceived as Celestial. Based on resonance, much as astronomy today notes resonance between planetary bodies as having played a role in the planetary evolution of the galaxy. If it were the case the effect would be planet wide not one area rising whilst another is falling.

There is also the textbook version, just verified, which has the Dark Age in the West from ca 29 to the Middle Ages, somewhere prior or close to 1150 ce and the Founding of the University of Paris.

Your version has two Dark Ages occurring in what Eastern philosophy would perceive a one arc of the Precession of the Equinoxes, in total 24,000 years. The Western version is slightly longer and has equal amounts of time for each Age, whereas in the Eastern version the length of each of the Ages differ; gold, silver, bronze, iron. If we can imagine a 24,000 year clock with the longest Age at the top, the shortest at the bottom. Each Age occurring twice within the cycle, descending in the 12,000 downward arc and as ascending in the 12, 000 upward arc. The top Age approximately 12,000 bce the bottom Age, iron or Dark, the lowest or mid-point as 499 ce.

That two Dark Ages would occur in such close proximity as you cite is open to question. The Eastern version and the textbook version has it as one Age that ends, not occurring twice within the span of ancient, medieval or modern history. Its descent to the lowest point turning into an ascent that leads into the following Age. The Dark Ages not being two but one, descent and ascent.
One account has them extending from 700 B.C. to 1700 A.D.

Please cite your source.
And what do you think "Dark Age" means?
My source was a lecture I attended as a guest, I do not recall the name of the person who was versed in oriental astronomy, and addressed the topic as a mistake that crept into almanacs for the first time from calculations made around 700 bce that had The Dark Ages lasting for 432,000 years.

A cycle of 24,000 years with the Ages calculated to fit that time frame was presented as what prevailed prior to the miscalculation. It made more sense than 432,000 years. The duration of the Dark Ages were calculated to be 2400 years, 1200 prior to and 1200 after 499 ce, its lowest point. The documentary ‘The Great Year’ also refers to a 24,000 year cycle, although it does not mention the duration of the Ages.

Do you have a source for your version. It appears unlikely that the a Dark Age would end and then reoccur within the time frame you mentioned.

The Dark Ages is what is generally perceived as an era of economic, intellectual, and cultural decline. A material age prior to the discoveries of electricity and inner forces.
You missed the key point about a dark age, in that writing stops.
You are talking bollocks about this lecture.
No such lecture ever happened.
From 100bce to the fall of Rome circa 400ce in Britain, and later elsewhere was not in any sense a dark age. And many areas never experienced a dark age, throughout the whole period.
This is true even by your own definition.
owl of Minerva
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Re: What is the point of Higher Education?

Post by owl of Minerva »

Sculptor wrote: Sat Jan 29, 2022 4:31 pm
owl of Minerva wrote: Sat Jan 29, 2022 3:21 am
Sculptor wrote: Fri Jan 28, 2022 7:36 pm

One account has them extending from 700 B.C. to 1700 A.D.

Please cite your source.
And what do you think "Dark Age" means?
My source was a lecture I attended as a guest, I do not recall the name of the person who was versed in oriental astronomy, and addressed the topic as a mistake that crept into almanacs for the first time from calculations made around 700 bce that had The Dark Ages lasting for 432,000 years.

A cycle of 24,000 years with the Ages calculated to fit that time frame was presented as what prevailed prior to the miscalculation. It made more sense than 432,000 years. The duration of the Dark Ages were calculated to be 2400 years, 1200 prior to and 1200 after 499 ce, its lowest point. The documentary ‘The Great Year’ also refers to a 24,000 year cycle, although it does not mention the duration of the Ages.

Do you have a source for your version. It appears unlikely that the a Dark Age would end and then reoccur within the time frame you mentioned.

The Dark Ages is what is generally perceived as an era of economic, intellectual, and cultural decline. A material age prior to the discoveries of electricity and inner forces.
You missed the key point about a dark age, in that writing stops.
You are talking bollocks about this lecture.
No such lecture ever happened.
From 100bce to the fall of Rome circa 400ce in Britain, and later elsewhere was not in any sense a dark age. And many areas never experienced a dark age, throughout the whole period.
This is true even by your own definition.

As I cited The Dark Ages in totality were gradational: descent, depth, ascent.

The two you cited were episodic. What is their source or reference, and If scientifically valid, what is the evidence; astronomical or mathematical, that supports them?
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Sculptor
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Re: What is the point of Higher Education?

Post by Sculptor »

owl of Minerva wrote: Sat Jan 29, 2022 8:26 pm
Sculptor wrote: Sat Jan 29, 2022 4:31 pm
owl of Minerva wrote: Sat Jan 29, 2022 3:21 am

My source was a lecture I attended as a guest, I do not recall the name of the person who was versed in oriental astronomy, and addressed the topic as a mistake that crept into almanacs for the first time from calculations made around 700 bce that had The Dark Ages lasting for 432,000 years.

A cycle of 24,000 years with the Ages calculated to fit that time frame was presented as what prevailed prior to the miscalculation. It made more sense than 432,000 years. The duration of the Dark Ages were calculated to be 2400 years, 1200 prior to and 1200 after 499 ce, its lowest point. The documentary ‘The Great Year’ also refers to a 24,000 year cycle, although it does not mention the duration of the Ages.

Do you have a source for your version. It appears unlikely that the a Dark Age would end and then reoccur within the time frame you mentioned.

The Dark Ages is what is generally perceived as an era of economic, intellectual, and cultural decline. A material age prior to the discoveries of electricity and inner forces.
You missed the key point about a dark age, in that writing stops.
You are talking bollocks about this lecture.
No such lecture ever happened.
From 100bce to the fall of Rome circa 400ce in Britain, and later elsewhere was not in any sense a dark age. And many areas never experienced a dark age, throughout the whole period.
This is true even by your own definition.

As I cited The Dark Ages in totality were gradational: descent, depth, ascent.

The two you cited were episodic. What is their source or reference, and If scientifically valid, what is the evidence; astronomical or mathematical, that supports them?
You do not know what a dark age is.
THis is the last post on the subject
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