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vegetariantaxidermy
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Re: Hello!

Post by vegetariantaxidermy » Wed Feb 21, 2018 9:44 pm

-1- wrote:
Wed Feb 21, 2018 9:35 pm
And the bible is famous for not having even one single solitary joke in it. Not one that you guffaw to, anyhow.

So that's what's wrong with it! You are absolutely right. The babble is completely devoid of humour.

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vegetariantaxidermy
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Re: Hello!

Post by vegetariantaxidermy » Wed Feb 21, 2018 9:48 pm

-1- wrote:
Wed Feb 21, 2018 9:42 pm
vegetariantaxidermy wrote:
Wed Feb 21, 2018 1:47 am

I think he must have seen Groundhog Day.
Is that a movie? If it is, it sounds like the title of a very scary horror movie.
You haven't heard of it? It's very clever, about a man who keeps waking up to the same day, every day, but no one else is aware of it. He does all kinds of things with the time. Learns the piano, languages etc. etc. all the things he didn't have time to do.

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Re: Hello!

Post by -1- » Wed Feb 21, 2018 10:01 pm

vegetariantaxidermy wrote:
Wed Feb 21, 2018 9:48 pm
You haven't heard of it? It's very clever, about a man who keeps waking up to the same day, every day, but no one else is aware of it. He does all kinds of things with the time. Learns the piano, languages etc. etc. all the things he didn't have time to do.
I think the first time I read that theme, it was in my childhood's reading list. Some Sci Fi, where an advertising company rescues the souls of a trainfull of recent accident victims, all dead, and puts the souls in a simulation where people respond to different advertising methods, as a basis for a research. Every day they go to sleep, and the next day is the same calendar day, nobody ages, and nobody knows or notices the lack of difference.

Then there were others.

My favourite time-travel sci fi story had to do with a girl, who could advance herself and a boy several hundred years into the future, or a few minutes, her choice, but the drawback was that the entire world was advanced into the future, so nothing changed in appearance and function. That was pretty clever, too, I thought, because it was so believable.

ihoardpoetry
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Re: Hello!

Post by ihoardpoetry » Wed Feb 21, 2018 10:02 pm

-1- wrote:
Wed Feb 21, 2018 9:35 pm

I hear you, IHeardPoetry, on all fronts.

I am a fan of long sentences. I'd rather read and write a bunch of run-in sentences than get through the hacking cough-like style of Hemingway-like writers. Hemingway, being American and a Nobel-prize winner, had enough clout to poison the writing of North American writers for over four generations. They swear by short sentences. In schools, you get whipped, tied to the whipping post, if you write long sentences. Whereas sentences can be long and non-confusing, as long as the undulation of the ebb-and-tide of ideas and their density is well proportioned. Heck, Milne, in Winnie-the-Pooh, wrote paragraph-length (ten or more lines long) sentences, and that was children's literature! And then Hemingway comes along and each person unable to write cohesively thinks he was a genius. He was, but just because someone else writes short sentences, he may still remain a non-genius and furthermore, an incompetent writer.

Brrr. Ho-hum ho-hum.

With regards to your Bible knowledge: I am no judge of that, I hardly read any of the lines there. Not for lack of interest, but for lack of ability to read. I suffer (and so does my immediate human environment*) from an advanced case of ADD, and I can't read. Only humour. And the bible is famous for not having even one single solitary joke in it. Not one that you guffaw to, anyhow.

I am also a teen-ager. My ex girlfriend, back 35 years ago, when we first started dating, said to me, "Andrew, I imagine you will go from your teen-age crisis straight into midlife crisis without a break." I was 28 at the time, but a rather immature twenty-eight-year old. And guess what: she was 23 years older than I.

She's still alive, in her eighties, in some old folks home, busy pooping her diapers. But from the outside, she still looks gorgeous. I mean that, not joking. Taut, soft skin, nice smell (after a fresh diaper change), beautiful face, nice, feminine voice, beautiful, lush hair.

That's my how-do-you-do.

One thing is puzzling. "Soccer/Football moms" with an 'o', not 'u', to emphasize Americanization. Which of the quoted words in ye faire Englande is spelled with a u? Futball, or Sucker? I like sucker moms. We call them MILFs here. Problem, there is not enough of them to go around. Or maybe you are in Germany? Fussball. Or in Poland. Futball. Or in Hungary. Labdarugas.


My lecturers do not like long sentences, as I am consistently told in the feedback to my essays. It's definitely hard to make the shift from writing fiction, where sentence length is entirely your choice, to academic writing, where there is much more an expected format. So I can definitely see the influence there. One of my lecturers especially really pushes shorter sentences and simpler language. It means I can't stylize any of my work, which is a little bit frustrating! Ah, Winnie the Pooh was one of my childhood favourites. I remember having a beautifully decorated hardback copy, which I'm pretty sure I still own to this day, though it's crammed in my Nan's attack somewhere. Definitely. I also think there's something to be said about the idiosyncratic nature of writing: short sentences may be one person's forte, but not another's. Writing is a craft that you mould to your own taste, attempting to fit a particular mould ruins the craft, in my opinion.

Interesting. I'm on the spectrum, and alas, I'm awful at reading sarcasm. So part of me is unsure whether you *literally* cannot read anything other than humour or not. I'm going to wager that's not the case totally, though I could be wrong. It's interesting. My other half has ADD and I'm on the spectrum, among other things (trauma-related mental health problems, and the like) which definitely makes an interesting combination.

It's pleasant to see when people age well. I live with my Nan (well, kind of. In term time I'm in University accomodation, but when I return home, I live with her), and she's amazing for her age. Still goes out to the bingo and club (Working club, not like, nightclub. That's an interesting thought) and definitely loves a fair few Whiskeys. If I am half as good as her when I'm that old, I'll be happy. Getting old is definitely something I'm fearing.

Ahh, so in England/U.K. for the most part we say 'mum' which produces a lovely (not) dulled tone, which often sounds harsh, sometimes whiney. The American version is for the most part 'mom' - or at least, that which I've had contact with, including but not limited to trashy, chickflick American T.V.and films, and I have family over there, too. Your language knowledge is impressive. I'm wanting to learn German, actually, partially because it's where I'd wanted to study, though I never took the chance, disappointingly. Ahhh, 'MILFs'. I thought that was such a 2009 term, I didn't realize people still used it!

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Re: Hello!

Post by -1- » Wed Feb 21, 2018 10:33 pm

ihoardpoetry wrote:
Wed Feb 21, 2018 10:02 pm

My lecturers do not like long sentences, as I am consistently told in the feedback to my essays. It's definitely hard to make the shift from writing fiction, where sentence length is entirely your choice, to academic writing, where there is much more an expected format. So I can definitely see the influence there. One of my lecturers especially really pushes shorter sentences and simpler language. It means I can't stylize any of my work, which is a little bit frustrating! Ah, Winnie the Pooh was one of my childhood favourites. I remember having a beautifully decorated hardback copy, which I'm pretty sure I still own to this day, though it's crammed in my Nan's attack somewhere. Definitely. I also think there's something to be said about the idiosyncratic nature of writing: short sentences may be one person's forte, but not another's. Writing is a craft that you mould to your own taste, attempting to fit a particular mould ruins the craft, in my opinion.

Interesting. I'm on the spectrum, and alas, I'm awful at reading sarcasm. So part of me is unsure whether you *literally* cannot read anything other than humour or not. I'm going to wager that's not the case totally, though I could be wrong. It's interesting. My other half has ADD and I'm on the spectrum, among other things (trauma-related mental health problems, and the like) which definitely makes an interesting combination.

It's pleasant to see when people age well. I live with my Nan (well, kind of. In term time I'm in University accomodation, but when I return home, I live with her), and she's amazing for her age. Still goes out to the bingo and club (Working club, not like, nightclub. That's an interesting thought) and definitely loves a fair few Whiskeys. If I am half as good as her when I'm that old, I'll be happy. Getting old is definitely something I'm fearing.

Ahh, so in England/U.K. for the most part we say 'mum' which produces a lovely (not) dulled tone, which often sounds harsh, sometimes whiney. The American version is for the most part 'mom' - or at least, that which I've had contact with, including but not limited to trashy, chickflick American T.V.and films, and I have family over there, too. Your language knowledge is impressive. I'm wanting to learn German, actually, partially because it's where I'd wanted to study, though I never took the chance, disappointingly. Ahhh, 'MILFs'. I thought that was such a 2009 term, I didn't realize people still used it![/size]
It's not quite literal that I can't read. But more so than not. I had to abandon a whole bunch of learning streams due to this. Finally I ended up with a degree in math and computer science, because reading is minimal in those subjects, and figuring things out is maximal... my favourite mix.

Isn't that interesting. I wanted to spend time in Germany, too. I am Jewish, but I was enamoured by the German culture and cleanliness and engineering and precision when I visited there in my late teens. And the language is learnable! Not easy, no language is, but it can be done. You can learn the entire grammar in an intensive half-year, and then the vocabulary building is another two or five years, depending your speed. I never naturalized my German, I always had to construct the sentences from the basement up, each sentence, thinking about the rules, the conjugation, the declination... boy, I never spoke the language, but shards of my old massive knowledge still remain.

I'm glad to hear you are functional, despite being on the spectrum and all. Not easily done, I'm sure, but your intellect, I surmise, is carrying you along just nicely.

If I hadn't been in a relationship right now, I'd ask for your nan's phone number or email address. It's futile, because I am in a fully satisfying (for me anyhow) partnership now. We are completely different from the characters in the movie "Maudie", but our relating is very similar to the couple's in the movie. It's a Canadian film, very moving, very emotional, long and drawn out, but not one dull moment nevertheless in it. I warmly recommend it for anyone. No football mums in it anywhere, despite being a North American chick flick. (There is much worse, to men everywhere: a weak-looking, frail little lady, who is nevertheless stronger than steel. Not physically.) And she is to her man in the movie what my friend is to me, except I never beat her once (and never will), while the man did raise his hand on 'er in the movie.

So it's the MOM word you use with U over there! I never expected that.

What about ma'm, or mammy? What do her servants in the house call your nan? I mean the upstairs servants. Ma'm, or mum?

I am joking, but true, I never expected the O/U dichotomy in the middle of a mother.

It's very true what you wrote about moulding your writing style to your soul, and getting comfortable with it. The same principle applies to many human relationships between the individual and his or her habits. From not exchanging well-worn, comfy sneakers with others, to not writing like someone else, to not switching chewing gum.

Luckily the business writing course in my college was considered a joke, even by the prof, so my funny stories made the grade. And when I wrote up the physics experiments, as required, I'd steal in points like "the conservation of energy has been tried over the centuries, because much like gold was futilely tried to be manufactured from other matter, these days energy in the form of gasoline gets tried to be manufactures even from human feces." Or something to that effect, it's not verbatim.

This is one of the reasons ghost writers can command the biggest bucks in the writing professions. As a great average.

Do you read the newspaper comics? Every day?
Last edited by -1- on Wed Feb 21, 2018 10:36 pm, edited 1 time in total.

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vegetariantaxidermy
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Re: Hello!

Post by vegetariantaxidermy » Wed Feb 21, 2018 10:35 pm

-1- wrote:
Wed Feb 21, 2018 10:01 pm
vegetariantaxidermy wrote:
Wed Feb 21, 2018 9:48 pm
You haven't heard of it? It's very clever, about a man who keeps waking up to the same day, every day, but no one else is aware of it. He does all kinds of things with the time. Learns the piano, languages etc. etc. all the things he didn't have time to do.
I think the first time I read that theme, it was in my childhood's reading list. Some Sci Fi, where an advertising company rescues the souls of a trainfull of recent accident victims, all dead, and puts the souls in a simulation where people respond to different advertising methods, as a basis for a research. Every day they go to sleep, and the next day is the same calendar day, nobody ages, and nobody knows or notices the lack of difference.

Then there were others.

My favourite time-travel sci fi story had to do with a girl, who could advance herself and a boy several hundred years into the future, or a few minutes, her choice, but the drawback was that the entire world was advanced into the future, so nothing changed in appearance and function. That was pretty clever, too, I thought, because it was so believable.
So then the effect is the same as them being in suspended animation while minutes or hundreds of years passed?

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-1-
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Re: Hello!

Post by -1- » Wed Feb 21, 2018 10:38 pm

vegetariantaxidermy wrote:
Wed Feb 21, 2018 10:35 pm
-1- wrote:
Wed Feb 21, 2018 10:01 pm
vegetariantaxidermy wrote:
Wed Feb 21, 2018 9:48 pm
You haven't heard of it? It's very clever, about a man who keeps waking up to the same day, every day, but no one else is aware of it. He does all kinds of things with the time. Learns the piano, languages etc. etc. all the things he didn't have time to do.
I think the first time I read that theme, it was in my childhood's reading list. Some Sci Fi, where an advertising company rescues the souls of a trainfull of recent accident victims, all dead, and puts the souls in a simulation where people respond to different advertising methods, as a basis for a research. Every day they go to sleep, and the next day is the same calendar day, nobody ages, and nobody knows or notices the lack of difference.

Then there were others.

My favourite time-travel sci fi story had to do with a girl, who could advance herself and a boy several hundred years into the future, or a few minutes, her choice, but the drawback was that the entire world was advanced into the future, so nothing changed in appearance and function. That was pretty clever, too, I thought, because it was so believable.
So then the effect is the same as them being in suspended animation while minutes or hundreds of years passed?
Yes, same effect, along with everything else in the entire universe.

I am sure that it's got so popular now, that every half-assed magician can perform that now.

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vegetariantaxidermy
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Re: Hello!

Post by vegetariantaxidermy » Wed Feb 21, 2018 10:41 pm

-1- wrote:
Wed Feb 21, 2018 10:38 pm
vegetariantaxidermy wrote:
Wed Feb 21, 2018 10:35 pm
-1- wrote:
Wed Feb 21, 2018 10:01 pm


I think the first time I read that theme, it was in my childhood's reading list. Some Sci Fi, where an advertising company rescues the souls of a trainfull of recent accident victims, all dead, and puts the souls in a simulation where people respond to different advertising methods, as a basis for a research. Every day they go to sleep, and the next day is the same calendar day, nobody ages, and nobody knows or notices the lack of difference.

Then there were others.

My favourite time-travel sci fi story had to do with a girl, who could advance herself and a boy several hundred years into the future, or a few minutes, her choice, but the drawback was that the entire world was advanced into the future, so nothing changed in appearance and function. That was pretty clever, too, I thought, because it was so believable.
So then the effect is the same as them being in suspended animation while minutes or hundreds of years passed?
Yes, same effect, along with everything else in the entire universe.

I am sure that it's got so popular now, that every half-assed magician can perform that now.
Not really a time travel story then. I don't understand what you mean in the second sentence. Actually none of your examples are anything like Groundhog Day.

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Re: Hello!

Post by -1- » Wed Feb 21, 2018 10:46 pm

vegetariantaxidermy wrote:
Wed Feb 21, 2018 10:41 pm
Not really a time travel story then. I don't understand what you mean in the second sentence. Actually none of your examples are anything like Groundhog Day.
The first example was EXACTLY like ground hog day. The second example was completely different, you're right about that.

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vegetariantaxidermy
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Re: Hello!

Post by vegetariantaxidermy » Wed Feb 21, 2018 10:51 pm

-1- wrote:
Wed Feb 21, 2018 10:46 pm
vegetariantaxidermy wrote:
Wed Feb 21, 2018 10:41 pm
Not really a time travel story then. I don't understand what you mean in the second sentence. Actually none of your examples are anything like Groundhog Day.
The first example was EXACTLY like ground hog day. The second example was completely different, you're right about that.
Nope.

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Re: Hello!

Post by -1- » Wed Feb 21, 2018 11:05 pm

Hold on... you meant to say this of the first example that I thought was reminiscent of Groudn Hog days:
vegetariantaxidermy wrote:
Wed Feb 21, 2018 10:35 pm
So then the effect is the same as them being in suspended animation while minutes or hundreds of years passed?
No, the first example I bought up was not a suspension. Time passed, and the minds of the souls in the simulation were reset every midnight. So to them, from their perspective, it was like GHD. But form the experimenters', and from the reader's point of view, it was not a repeating time thing.

I see what you mean now, with your protest.

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vegetariantaxidermy
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Re: Hello!

Post by vegetariantaxidermy » Wed Feb 21, 2018 11:08 pm

-1- wrote:
Wed Feb 21, 2018 11:05 pm
Hold on... you meant to say this of the first example that I thought was reminiscent of Groudn Hog days:
vegetariantaxidermy wrote:
Wed Feb 21, 2018 10:35 pm
So then the effect is the same as them being in suspended animation while minutes or hundreds of years passed?
No, the first example I bought up was not a suspension. Time passed, and the minds of the souls in the simulation were reset every midnight. So to them, from their perspective, it was like GHD. But form the experimenters', and from the reader's point of view, it was not a repeating time thing.

I see what you mean now, with your protest.
I wasn't referring to the first one.

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Eodnhoj7
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Re: Hello!

Post by Eodnhoj7 » Thu Feb 22, 2018 2:33 am

-1- wrote:
Fri Feb 16, 2018 4:49 am
Hi, continuing your welcoming, you will notice, IHordpoetry, that here we are divided into two bitterly antagonistic, die-hard fighting groups of atheists and religionists. The atheists are more-or-less united under the flagship of science, reason, healthy common sense and good looks, while the religionists are more diverse, with Ouzo Prophet Bobevanson, and experiencer-of-god Attofishpie, to reason-denier iron-hat misogynist Nick_A, to mathematics self-reflecting philosopher JohnDoe7 (have I got you in the right group, JohnDoe7), as well as having a third, smaller independent group of ethical moralists, or moralizing ethicists, the back bone of which comprises Philosophy Explorer, Belinda, and Prof. We also have a "Depak Chopra" affinity group.

If I miscategorized any one of the foregoing, then my apologies, and i stand corrected should anyone send in a correction to this thread.

The atheist faction includes me, uwot, I think echoesofhorizon as well, if I am not mistaken, and some others as well.

There are some poets as well in our midst, they write poetry, and they publish it in the poetry thread.

well, welcome, IHoardPoetry, and I hope you shalt enjoy this site!!
Nonsense, the inherent polarity within this site (although it is not as of a high degree as I wish) provides a necessary dualism that results in a synthesis of definition...hence further clarity.

I am not mathematician, but I appreciate the compliment...I think,...more of a metaphysicist or logician...maybe? One thing is for sure, I am better at being confused than most...and I take that as my sole trade.

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