Star Trek’s Stoics: The Vulcans

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Philosophy Now
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Star Trek’s Stoics: The Vulcans

Post by Philosophy Now » Tue Jan 27, 2015 10:46 pm

Steven Umbrello explores parallel philosophical universes.

https://philosophynow.org/issues/106/St ... he_Vulcans

Blaggard
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Re: Star Trek’s Stoics: The Vulcans

Post by Blaggard » Wed Jan 28, 2015 12:29 am

TBH and that's no bad thing the Vulcans were not Stoics, they had at least some humility and died- almost. In Star Trek the new "bollocks" film, The Remans were the stoics.
Remans were the humanoid and at least partially telepathic inhabitants of the planet Remus.
Ironically.
The Remans were created as a response to the challenge of devising a new, terrifying alien race for Nemesis. "The idea of the Remans being vampirelike slaves, laboring away in the dilithium mines, never seeing the sun, grew out of our desire to create a truly monstrous race," recalled John Logan. "It seemed obvious to me that the Romulans would subjugate some other race to dig dilithium for them. Much too messy for our pristine and elegant Romulans."
I am a massive Star Trek nerd amongst other things, but you have to have strings to eros' bow. ;)

The master becomes the servant, but not on his own terms, if you catch my ultra nerd drift. :D

mugglebornnerdyvegan
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Re: Star Trek’s Stoics: The Vulcans

Post by mugglebornnerdyvegan » Tue Dec 12, 2017 7:33 pm

Here's a quote from the article:
>>
Essentially, Stoicism does not want you to try and overcome all negative situations, nor to avoid bad, uncomfortable or disturbing scenarios; instead, Stoic principles require individuals to change the way they perceive such situations, which will change the way they react to them.
<<

This gives the notion of Stoicism as a type of fatalism, which I'd say is an accurate description of the spirit of Stoicism or essentially everything I've heard so far from Stoics seems to possess that essence, but I would disagree that the philosophy of Surak shares that essence... Surak was the response to coming close to annihilation but instead of just accepting it, as a reality that shouldn't be avoided or overcome, it instead inspired a new level of deliberately trying to change reality... The above quote seems directly at odds with this other quote that was also cited by the article:

>>
“Logic is the cement of our civilization, with which we ascend from chaos, using reason as our guide” – T’Plana-Hath, Vulcan High Priestess
<<

In practice, there were very very few things Vulcans felt they had no control over, they felt that by maximizing logic they could maximize their lives, to live long and prosper... Not to just accept negative or disturbing scenarios...

Silly humans, it's as if you got the exact opposite idea of Suraks true intention ✌

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Eodnhoj7
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Re: Star Trek’s Stoics: The Vulcans

Post by Eodnhoj7 » Tue Dec 12, 2017 9:30 pm

Could not parallel universes be observed as the flow of time, considering time itself acts a form of division between dimensions?

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Eodnhoj7
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Re: Star Trek’s Stoics: The Vulcans

Post by Eodnhoj7 » Tue Dec 12, 2017 10:33 pm

mugglebornnerdyvegan wrote:
Tue Dec 12, 2017 7:33 pm
Here's a quote from the article:
>>
Essentially, Stoicism does not want you to try and overcome all negative situations, nor to avoid bad, uncomfortable or disturbing scenarios; instead, Stoic principles require individuals to change the way they perceive such situations, which will change the way they react to them.

You can see examples of this in Stoic Metaphysics, such as Zeno's Paradoxes, where the measurement systems are continually changing causing an appearance of "lack of movement" in the surrounding world. Stoicism is heavily relativistic in regards to logistic measurement systems, and in my opinion only, can cause certain degrees of mental instability within an individual as they do not know how to percieve the world. In a seperate respect, the fatalism (as you observed) seems to be the anchoring point of many rational processes and this causes an inability to really change how they percieve the world. Stoicism manifests its fundamentally as dualistic measurement systems within a person's individual perspective cause an inherent polarity or "flux" within the individual himself.

Stoicism has its place however, as from personal experience Marcus Aurelius's Meditations have proved to me to be a valuable and practical philosophical text. It is very "limiting", in the long run however if one want to progress towards a philosophical center point.

<<

This gives the notion of Stoicism as a type of fatalism, which I'd say is an accurate description of the spirit of Stoicism or essentially everything I've heard so far from Stoics seems to possess that essence, but I would disagree that the philosophy of Surak shares that essence... Surak was the response to coming close to annihilation but instead of just accepting it, as a reality that shouldn't be avoided or overcome, it instead inspired a new level of deliberately trying to change reality... The above quote seems directly at odds with this other quote that was also cited by the article:

>>
“Logic is the cement of our civilization, with which we ascend from chaos, using reason as our guide” – T’Plana-Hath, Vulcan High Priestess
<<

In practice, there were very very few things Vulcans felt they had no control over, they felt that by maximizing logic they could maximize their lives, to live long and prosper... Not to just accept negative or disturbing scenarios...

Silly humans, it's as if you got the exact opposite idea of Suraks true intention ✌

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