The Problem of "If/Then"

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Eodnhoj7
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Re: The Problem of "If/Then"

Post by Eodnhoj7 »

Skepdick wrote: Tue Jul 13, 2021 7:58 pm
Eodnhoj7 wrote: Tue Jul 13, 2021 6:44 pm No you are just expressing "if A then B" in a new form with f(), you did not define the internal workings of f().
So what? You can't define the internal workings of an electron. It's a noumenon.
Eodnhoj7 wrote: Tue Jul 13, 2021 6:44 pm The statement "If I put my hand over the fire then it will burn" does not Express why it will get burned, only that it will burn. The same occurs for all if/then statements.
Why do you want to know why?
But "if/then" is a mode of reasoning, it is defined by it ability to define. To define without the ability to define definition is to make strict assertions. The phenomenon is taken as strictly assumed. "If/then" as undefined means "if/then" can make any number of assertions.
mickthinks
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Re: The Problem of "If/Then"

Post by mickthinks »

But "if/then" is a mode of reasoning ...
No, it is a logical operator in the same way as AND and OR and NOT

... it is defined by it ability to define.
No more than AND and OR and NOT are defined by their "ability to define"
Eodnhoj7
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Re: The Problem of "If/Then"

Post by Eodnhoj7 »

mickthinks wrote: Wed Jul 14, 2021 8:17 am But "if/then" is a mode of reasoning ...
No, it is a logical operator in the same way as AND and OR and NOT

... it is defined by it ability to define.
No more than AND and OR and NOT are defined by their "ability to define"
If "A" exists then "B" exists observes a cause and effect chain where one input is presented and another output results...it is a mode of reasoning. As a "mode" of reasoning it is a "means". All operators are means.

"And", "Or", "Not" are applications of definition. Their addition or subtraction from an assertion reflects their ability to define.
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RCSaunders
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Re: The Problem of "If/Then"

Post by RCSaunders »

Eodnhoj7 wrote: Thu Aug 19, 2021 12:15 am If "A" exists then "B" exists observes a cause and effect ...
What nonsense. "If books exist then printing exists," "if a window exists glass exists," "if a band exists, musicians exist." There's no, "cause and effect." At most, you are describing a logical dependency, not, "cause."
Eodnhoj7
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Re: The Problem of "If/Then"

Post by Eodnhoj7 »

RCSaunders wrote: Thu Aug 19, 2021 1:52 am
Eodnhoj7 wrote: Thu Aug 19, 2021 12:15 am If "A" exists then "B" exists observes a cause and effect ...
What nonsense. "If books exist then printing exists," "if a window exists glass exists," "if a band exists, musicians exist." There's no, "cause and effect." At most, you are describing a logical dependency, not, "cause."
The cause is what is necessitated prior to what is observed later. One as the cause of two necessitates dependency being the phenomenon of cause and the effect, ie an effect is dependent upon cause. Under these terms, where one phenomenon changes into another (much like an observed book changes into the observation of the printing press) change is dependency as the latter form (the effect) is a recursion of the cause under the new form of the effect.
Dimebag
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Re: The Problem of "If/Then"

Post by Dimebag »

RCSaunders wrote: Thu Aug 19, 2021 1:52 am
Eodnhoj7 wrote: Thu Aug 19, 2021 12:15 am If "A" exists then "B" exists observes a cause and effect ...
What nonsense. "If books exist then printing exists," "if a window exists glass exists," "if a band exists, musicians exist." There's no, "cause and effect." At most, you are describing a logical dependency, not, "cause."
I was thinking of the if/then statement in relation to our choices we make. A conditional reaction. For example, if we run out of milk, then I will have to go to the shop to get some more. It is a result of past learning, observation and extrapolation.

Your usage also applies, but is a different case of if/then. But the above example seems to fit more with the original usage of the if/then statement in programming. There is first an observation, then a conditional reaction. It doesn’t necessarily describe a choice, but simply a reaction.

I think much of our learned behaviour probably consists of these kinds of situations.
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