solitude

So what's really going on?

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jetsetjason
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solitude

Post by jetsetjason » Fri Jan 18, 2008 1:54 pm

solitude is a good thing, it gives one more time to read books

:)

Richard Baron
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Post by Richard Baron » Fri Jan 18, 2008 1:58 pm

Yes indeed, books such as Nicomachean Ethics, VIII.i (1155a onwards) on the necessity of friendship.

jetsetjason
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Post by jetsetjason » Fri Jan 18, 2008 3:58 pm

The best place to make new friends is in the pub, after a debate at the mary ward centre.

Tis better alone than in bad company but a bit of good company now and then is a fine thing. :)

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xenophon
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Post by xenophon » Fri Jan 18, 2008 4:05 pm

Solitude is a great thing, but not too much of it.

I get annoyed when I can't get peace and quiet to read or relax. I envy those people you see standing on the train, reading a book with an iPod plugged in - how do they do that?

tbieter
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Post by tbieter » Sat Jan 19, 2008 1:10 am

Hi Lads,

Last summer I biked almost daily with my dog, Jack, the mile to Lake Phalen where I read Solitude - A Philosophical Encounter by Philip Koch. I recommend the book. I read it slowly. Here is an informative review http://www.hermitary.com/bookreviews/koch.html on an interesting Website.

Tom

tbieter
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Re: Re:

Post by tbieter » Fri Nov 02, 2012 9:02 pm

tbieter wrote:Hi Lads,

Last summer I biked almost daily with my dog, Jack, the mile to Lake Phalen where I read Solitude - A Philosophical Encounter by Philip Koch. I recommend the book. I read it slowly. Here is an informative review http://www.hermitary.com/bookreviews/koch.html on an interesting Website.

Tom
“It is one of the great paradoxes of solitude, that it offers us not an escape, not a paradise, not a dwelling place where we can haughtily maintain our integrity by ignoring a vicious and corrupt social world, but a way back to that world, and a new motive for being there. Moreover, it can enliven a new sense of what companionship means — and, with it, a courtesy and hospitability that goes beyond anything good manners might decree. Because, no matter who I am, and no matter what I might or might not have achieved, my very life depends on being prepared, always, for the one visitor who never comes, but might arrive at any moment, from the woods or from the town.” (Emphasis added)
http://www.aeonmagazine.com/oceanic-fee ... -solitude/

One young member of this forum describes his interest as "ignoring people" and also his occupation as "ignoring people" http://www.merriam-webster.com/dictionary/ignore

Such an uncommon expression of personal interest prompts some questions:

What could motivate a person to adopt such a general attitude toward others? Solitude?
Is he a misanthrope? http://www.thefreedictionary.com/misanthropy Is it reasonable to allege that he is?
Is such a general interest and occupation ethical?
What reasons can be offered to justify such an attitude?
Finally, is such an attitude consistent with the office of the philosopher?


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The Voice of Time
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Re: solitude

Post by The Voice of Time » Fri Nov 02, 2012 9:27 pm

/ignore_on

chaz wyman
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Re: solitude

Post by chaz wyman » Sat Nov 03, 2012 12:56 am

jetsetjason wrote:solitude is a good thing, it gives one more time to read books

:)
You are never alone with a book.

chaz wyman
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Re:

Post by chaz wyman » Sat Nov 03, 2012 12:59 am

xenophon wrote:Solitude is a great thing, but not too much of it.

I get annoyed when I can't get peace and quiet to read or relax. I envy those people you see standing on the train, reading a book with an iPod plugged in - how do they do that?
I do both; ipod and kindle. the choice of music has to be right - for the right book, though.
The Sex Pistols does not go with Trollop. Generally music for books has to be instrumental, as lyrics tend to get in the way of the text.

reasonvemotion
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Re: solitude

Post by reasonvemotion » Sat Nov 03, 2012 4:49 am

Is not solitude essential in restoring the body and mind? It has always been considered a luxury to me and I strive to obtain it. When I can, there are windows that look out onto the verandah and the outline of mountains in the not too far away distance, my desk is by these windows where I sit and reflect, feeling the summer breeze flow through the open windows, carrying with it the perfume of roses from the garden. Solitude is a positive and constructive state of comitment with oneself. Deep reading requires it, as does creativity and thinking and we all need time for solitude, although we probably differ in the amount each of us needs.

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Bernard
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Re: solitude

Post by Bernard » Sat Nov 03, 2012 11:21 am

Solitude is about making new friends...

Dimebag
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Re: solitude

Post by Dimebag » Mon Nov 05, 2012 12:19 pm

Just gimme...... Five minutes alooooone!!

It's interesting, I find that when I give myself some time out, away from others, I feel a sense of guilt like I should be spending that time with them rather than pursuing my interests. Of course in today's busy lifestyle one barely gets an hour to themselves in an average day, and most of the time out of work is spent with family or friends or with duties. When you only get to spend a few hours with your partner a day you cherish that, however for a person such as myself there comes a time when you feel you must be selfish and pursue your own interests in the company of yourself. I am an insular person, and therefore I prefer the company of myself over a crowded party.

On the other hand it seems like some people can't bear to spend a waking hour by themselves, and must be pursuing some contact with a friend, significant other, etc. I think these are outgoing people, who are almost dependent on others to make themselves feel ok. They are very social and seek out relationships. But how can such a person who can't bear to be alone with themselves be comfortable IN themselves.

duszek
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Re: solitude

Post by duszek » Mon Nov 05, 2012 1:02 pm

It might be a genetically encoded un-ease. Our ancestors survived because they organized themselves in groups or tribes. We also need other people in order to survive, but to a slightly lesser point.
Even hermits need to cooperate with the rest of the world. In order not to appear as a threat to them.

tbieter
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Re: solitude

Post by tbieter » Mon Nov 05, 2012 2:49 pm

duszek wrote:It might be a genetically encoded un-ease. Our ancestors survived because they organized themselves in groups or tribes. We also need other people in order to survive, but to a slightly lesser point.
Even hermits need to cooperate with the rest of the world. In order not to appear as a threat to them.
"Even hermits need to cooperate with the rest of the world."
viewtopic.php?f=5&t=4477&p=52760&hilit=hermitage#p52760

To me solitude means quiet, getting away from the constant noise of the city. When I lived in Duluth, I and my dog could escape at will to the BWCA. http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Boundary_W ... Wilderness Now I'm stuck with the noise of St. Paul. :cry:

duszek
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Re: solitude

Post by duszek » Mon Nov 05, 2012 3:07 pm

But you can sit or lie down in a room of your own and thus recover, can´t you ?
There is a story by Virginia Woolfe "A room of my own" but it is not a cheerful one.

I like to be in my room and to hear the neighbours from all directions. Most of them are bearable.

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