The Story of Existence: A Modern Creation Myth

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TimTimothy
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The Story of Existence: A Modern Creation Myth

Post by TimTimothy » Wed Nov 08, 2017 8:33 pm

Hi All:

I've been heads down working on a project for the past six months. I'm not ready to make it "public" but I am ready to begin talking about it with those who may help me to better refine it.

The Story of Existence is meant to provide a Modern Creation Myth for those of us who have left traditional creation myths behind. It is meant to build a foundational set of beliefs upon which a community of believers can be built (in this instance, what I call A Multinational Tribe).

The Story of Existence begins with what I call The PreVerse. That is all of existence prior to self-aware beings (which begins the second part, called The MeVerse).

The theory of the project is that all community is tribal, and all tribes must share common mythology. I feel strongly that those of us who have left religion or traditional mythology have proceeded as though tribalism and mythology are not needed. My experience tells me that we've made a mistake in this regard.

The question I'd like to is two-fold: 1) feedback on the overall project and 2) feedback on the specific components of the project.

The PreVerse is series of 12 steps represented by symbols starting at Existence and ending at Consciousness. It is meant to be broad, but consistent with the best of current knowledge.

What have I missed? What doesn't make sense? All feedback is welcome.

Go here to see it: The Story of Existence

RustyBert
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Re: The Story of Existence: A Modern Creation Myth

Post by RustyBert » Thu Nov 09, 2017 6:57 pm

I admire your dedication to unity, family of man, etc. I don't think though that some kind of "new tribe" with "new myths" is needed. There's already something called Secular Humanism, which values people for who they are, advocates science as an inexact but most valuable means to help the human family better itself. That's all we need (the ideas mostly, it's not necessary to use the SH label itself). Tribes and myths are just more of the same with different clothes.

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TimTimothy
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Re: The Story of Existence: A Modern Creation Myth

Post by TimTimothy » Fri Nov 10, 2017 5:23 pm

Thanks for the engagement...

So...I thought similarly for many years. Once I'd left the religion of my youth, I was confident that formalized community was anachronistic. I'd thought that City/State relationships along with scientific progress and capitalism were enough to provide all that is needed for human psychological flourishing. But then I started to notice a trend. Tribes never went away. We're all still devout members of many tribes. But some of these tribes exhibit better group cohesion and provide more meaningful lives to their members.

Tribes abound. Schools, Religion, Business, Cities, Fans, clubs, sports teams, etc. The election of Trump this past year laid this bare; not only on the Right, but on the Left as well. But the Right does it much more strongly.

Many on the Left are fearful of joining or formalizing groups. For example...you mentioned the idea of Secular Humanism. It's an idea, but it's not a community. There's very little to provide cohesion to the group.

And we see the alienation of whole segments of people in Western Culture.

That said...I'm not at all looking to build a Universal group here. The goal is not to convert the World. I want to build small, nomadic groups that transcend geographical boundary. Groups of 150-250 people who formalize their commitment to each other.

Thanks!

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Eodnhoj7
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Re: The Story of Existence: A Modern Creation Myth

Post by Eodnhoj7 » Fri Nov 10, 2017 9:22 pm

TimTimothy wrote:
Fri Nov 10, 2017 5:23 pm
Thanks for the engagement...

So...I thought similarly for many years. Once I'd left the religion of my youth, I was confident that formalized community was anachronistic. I'd thought that City/State relationships along with scientific progress and capitalism were enough to provide all that is needed for human psychological flourishing. But then I started to notice a trend. Tribes never went away. We're all still devout members of many tribes. But some of these tribes exhibit better group cohesion and provide more meaningful lives to their members.

Tribes abound. Schools, Religion, Business, Cities, Fans, clubs, sports teams, etc. The election of Trump this past year laid this bare; not only on the Right, but on the Left as well. But the Right does it much more strongly.

Many on the Left are fearful of joining or formalizing groups. For example...you mentioned the idea of Secular Humanism. It's an idea, but it's not a community. There's very little to provide cohesion to the group.

And we see the alienation of whole segments of people in Western Culture.

That said...I'm not at all looking to build a Universal group here. The goal is not to convert the World. I want to build small, nomadic groups that transcend geographical boundary. Groups of 150-250 people who formalize their commitment to each other.

Thanks!
What religion did you leave?

What is the nature of these nomadic groups (morality, beliefs, work/jobs, etc.)?

What promoted this thinking?

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TimTimothy
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Re: The Story of Existence: A Modern Creation Myth

Post by TimTimothy » Fri Nov 10, 2017 10:23 pm

I grew up mormon. But I've now been out longer than I was in (just barely).

The seeds of this idea were loosely born by an article I read way back in 2004, in the Alt-Paper The Stranger in Seattle. It's titled "The Urban Archipelago." It argues that Leftists are stranded on islands (cities) sprinkled around the world, and as such, our power is diluted. That Cities should figure out a way to build their power jointly.

But that's not where I'm taking this idea, per se. Fast forward many years, and I think many on the Left have done a poor job formalizing our communities. On the Right, religion still reigns, and many people are part of a cohesive tribe through that. There as a book a few years ago called "Bowling Alone" that chronicles the disappearance of community. It was a sobering read.

I also feel like Philosophers and Scientists have done a poor job turning ideas and discoveries into stories that can be consumed by lay people. That give them an alternative to what they've left. Philosophers and scientists seem hesitant to say "this I believe!" and plant a flag.

I want to plant a flag, but in a community that is progressive.

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TimTimothy
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Re: The Story of Existence: A Modern Creation Myth

Post by TimTimothy » Fri Nov 10, 2017 10:24 pm

Also...a year ago, after a ridiculous rent hike in Seattle, I pulled up Airbnb and asked "what could I do with the money I'm spending to live here?" What I discovered was that I could travel the world and save money. So I sold most of my things, put the rest in storage, and have been traveling since. My work is done over the internet, so I've been able to keep working.

I've met a lot of people who have detached from geography in this way.

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Bill Wiltrack
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Re: The Story of Existence: A Modern Creation Myth

Post by Bill Wiltrack » Fri Nov 10, 2017 11:05 pm

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.................................................................Good on you ! - Citizen of the world!




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thedoc
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Re: The Story of Existence: A Modern Creation Myth

Post by thedoc » Sat Nov 11, 2017 10:08 pm

Study the Mythology of the past (including religions) to form your new mythology, people are more likely to believe something they are already familiar with rather than something new and strange.

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TimTimothy
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Re: The Story of Existence: A Modern Creation Myth

Post by TimTimothy » Sat Nov 11, 2017 10:17 pm

thedoc wrote:
Sat Nov 11, 2017 10:08 pm
Study the Mythology of the past (including religions) to form your new mythology, people are more likely to believe something they are already familiar with rather than something new and strange.
Thanks...I've been reading a lot of Joseph Campbell...even though I think he mangled a lot. I like his voice ;-)

thedoc
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Re: The Story of Existence: A Modern Creation Myth

Post by thedoc » Sun Nov 12, 2017 12:37 am

TimTimothy wrote:
Sat Nov 11, 2017 10:17 pm
thedoc wrote:
Sat Nov 11, 2017 10:08 pm
Study the Mythology of the past (including religions) to form your new mythology, people are more likely to believe something they are already familiar with rather than something new and strange.
Thanks...I've been reading a lot of Joseph Campbell...even though I think he mangled a lot. I like his voice ;-)
I think Joseph Campbell understood a lot about Mythology in spite of anything he got wrong.

thedoc
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Re: The Story of Existence: A Modern Creation Myth

Post by thedoc » Sun Nov 12, 2017 12:39 am

BTW, did you know that in his youth he was a world champion runner?

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TimTimothy
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Re: The Story of Existence: A Modern Creation Myth

Post by TimTimothy » Sun Nov 12, 2017 12:43 am

thedoc wrote:
Sun Nov 12, 2017 12:37 am
TimTimothy wrote:
Sat Nov 11, 2017 10:17 pm
thedoc wrote:
Sat Nov 11, 2017 10:08 pm
Study the Mythology of the past (including religions) to form your new mythology, people are more likely to believe something they are already familiar with rather than something new and strange.
Thanks...I've been reading a lot of Joseph Campbell...even though I think he mangled a lot. I like his voice ;-)
I think Joseph Campbell understood a lot about Mythology in spite of anything he got wrong.
Oh...I agree. I should have clarified further my respect for the man. And yeah...he talks about his running in some of his writing.

I think he did a great service in his research. Really important work. The only place I really take issue is his tendency to boil everything down to the adage "Find your bliss." It's very individualistic in his use of it, and I think by doing that he missed a lot of the communitarian aspects of the mythologies he was discussing.

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