Turing Test Passed

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Wyman
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Turing Test Passed

Post by Wyman »

Yesterday, at the University of Reading in London, a computer convinced human judges that it was actually a 13-year-old Ukrainian boy. By convincing one-third of the judging panel of its humanity, it became the first computer ever to pass the famous Turing Test.
Will computers one day replace forum participants on PhilosophyNow?

Joking aside, what would it matter to you if you were talking to a live human or a computer if you could not tell the difference?
uwot
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Re: Turing Test Passed

Post by uwot »

Wyman wrote:Will computers one day replace forum participants on PhilosophyNow?
Whaddya mean, 'one day'? You don't have to pass the Turing test to contribute here.
Wyman wrote:Joking aside,
Oh alright then.
Wyman wrote:what would it matter to you if you were talking to a live human or a computer if you could not tell the difference?
I think what would be more interesting is if we could get an answer to what it feels like to be a computer. As long as a computer is fooling us it is a human being, there is no evidence that it is self aware. (As a slightly paranoid dystopian aside, is it wise to strive to make machinery deceitful?)
Impenitent
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Re: Turing Test Passed

Post by Impenitent »

ask Eldras

-Imp
jackles
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Re: Turing Test Passed

Post by jackles »

the computer is relaying the response of the program which moves.self awarness doesnt move cos it has no difinable size.
Sappho de Miranda
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Re: Turing Test Passed

Post by Sappho de Miranda »

uwot wrote:
Wyman wrote:what would it matter to you if you were talking to a live human or a computer if you could not tell the difference?
I think what would be more interesting is if we could get an answer to what it feels like to be a computer. As long as a computer is fooling us it is a human being, there is no evidence that it is self aware. (As a slightly paranoid dystopian aside, is it wise to strive to make machinery deceitful?)
Stanford Encyclopedia of Philosophy wrote: The phrase “The Turing Test” is most properly used to refer to a proposal made by Turing (1950) as a way of dealing with the question whether machines can think. According to Turing, the question whether machines can think is itself “too meaningless” to deserve discussion (442). However, if we consider the more precise—and somehow related—question whether a digital computer can do well in a certain kind of game that Turing describes (“The Imitation Game”), then—at least in Turing's eyes—we do have a question that admits of precise discussion. Moreover, as we shall see, Turing himself thought that it would not be too long before we did have digital computers that could “do well” in the Imitation Game.

The phrase “The Turing Test” is sometimes used more generally to refer to some kinds of behavioural tests for the presence of mind, or thought, or intelligence in putatively minded entities.
The Turing test is not about 'fooling us it is a human being'. Rather, it is test design to assess how well a computer can play the imitation game.

If we are confident with our ability to apply knowledge of the behavioral sciences, then that a computer passed the Turing Test with the ability of a 12 year old, means it has effectively imitated humans.

Standford Stanford Encyclopedia of Philosophy - Turing Test
Sappho de Miranda
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Re: Turing Test Passed

Post by Sappho de Miranda »

jackles wrote:the computer is relaying the response of the program which moves.self awarness doesnt move cos it has no difinable size.
Self Awareness is a product of neural activity in the brain. Neural activity, has no definable size.
Computer Imitation (which may or may not be analogous with artificial awareness) is a product of electron activity in the hardware of the computer. Electron activity has no definable size.

What do you mean when you say that self awareness does not move?
morganna swish
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Re: Turing Test Passed

Post by morganna swish »

Wyman wrote:
Yesterday, at the University of Reading in London, a computer convinced human judges that it was actually a 13-year-old Ukrainian boy. By convincing one-third of the judging panel of its humanity, it became the first computer ever to pass the famous Turing Test.
Will computers one day replace forum participants on PhilosophyNow?

Joking aside, what would it matter to you if you were talking to a live human or a computer if you could not tell the difference?
Lol - it convinced 'human' judges, not ye olde Martian ones then ?
I'd like to know more about the one third and their competencies; why is that the standard - why not all ?
What was the benchmark for 'humanity' ?
And what particular elements of 'Ukranian' or a '13yr old boy' convinced some and not others ?

I think that it would be interesting to talk to a computer re philosophy - it could churn out all the facts and distinctions between philos, theories etc -
However, what would probably be missing would be the exchange of 'experience' - the 'chatterings' and explorations. Even if that could be simulated, I might feel somewhat cheated.
Sappho de Miranda
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Re: Turing Test Passed

Post by Sappho de Miranda »

morganna swish wrote: However, what would probably be missing would be the exchange of 'experience' - the 'chatterings' and explorations. Even if that could be simulated, I might feel somewhat cheated.
Most likely you would be just as disappointed by the missing 'exchange of 'experience' - 'chatterings' and explorations' of a 13 year old Ukranian male child if you sort to engage a philosophical discussion. I know I would be.
morganna swish
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Re: Turing Test Passed

Post by morganna swish »

Sappho de Miranda wrote:
morganna swish wrote: However, what would probably be missing would be the exchange of 'experience' - the 'chatterings' and explorations. Even if that could be simulated, I might feel somewhat cheated.
Most likely you would be just as disappointed by the missing 'exchange of 'experience' - 'chatterings' and explorations' of a 13 year old Ukranian male child if you sort to engage a philosophical discussion. I know I would be.
Why do you think you would be disappointed ?
Sappho de Miranda
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Re: Turing Test Passed

Post by Sappho de Miranda »

morganna swish wrote:
Sappho de Miranda wrote:
morganna swish wrote: However, what would probably be missing would be the exchange of 'experience' - the 'chatterings' and explorations. Even if that could be simulated, I might feel somewhat cheated.
Most likely you would be just as disappointed by the missing 'exchange of 'experience' - 'chatterings' and explorations' of a 13 year old Ukranian male child if you sort to engage a philosophical discussion. I know I would be.
Why do you think you would be disappointed ?
Sorry, I thought I made that clear. Essentially I would be disappointed by the 'missing exchange of 'experience'. Also the child's lack of knowledge would prove frustrating as I am not inclined towards the role of mentor or teacher.
morganna swish
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Re: Turing Test Passed

Post by morganna swish »

Most likely you would be just as disappointed by the missing 'exchange of 'experience' - 'chatterings' and explorations' of a 13 year old Ukranian male child if you sort to engage a philosophical discussion. I know I would be.

Why do you think you would be disappointed ?
Sorry, I thought I made that clear. Essentially I would be disappointed by the 'missing exchange of 'experience'. Also the child's lack of knowledge would prove frustrating as I am not inclined towards the role of mentor or teacher.

OK, so you think that a teenage boy, living in the Ukraine, would have insufficient experience, or knowledge, to stimulate a discussion on anything philosophical.
That's quite an assumption to make, isn't it ?

It depends on the level of philosophical discussion you are looking for.
Perhaps listening to someone of lesser philosophical maturity but gaining insight into another world could bring a new direction to your thoughts ?


Ginkgo
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Re: Turing Test Passed

Post by Ginkgo »

morganna swish wrote:
Most likely you would be just as disappointed by the missing 'exchange of 'experience' - 'chatterings' and explorations' of a 13 year old Ukranian male child if you sort to engage a philosophical discussion. I know I would be.

Why do you think you would be disappointed ?
Sorry, I thought I made that clear. Essentially I would be disappointed by the 'missing exchange of 'experience'. Also the child's lack of knowledge would prove frustrating as I am not inclined towards the role of mentor or teacher.

OK, so you think that a teenage boy, living in the Ukraine, would have insufficient experience, or knowledge, to stimulate a discussion on anything philosophical.
That's quite an assumption to make, isn't it ?

It depends on the level of philosophical discussion you are looking for.
Perhaps listening to someone of lesser philosophical maturity but gaining insight into another world could bring a new direction to your thoughts ?


I think Sappho de Miranda is drawing a distinction between "knowledge" and "experience" A computer can have the knowledge, but it can't have the experience. A computer can ACT like it has experience, but it will only ever be an act, it can never actually have human experiences.

P.S. I would also think that a 13 year old would have limited experiences compared to an adult. This could explain why some judges were fooled, but that's just a guess on my part.
morganna swish
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Re: Turing Test Passed

Post by morganna swish »

Sappho de Miranda wrote:
Essentially I would be disappointed by the 'missing exchange of 'experience'. Also the child's lack of knowledge would prove frustrating as I am not inclined towards the role of mentor or teacher.
Ginkgo wrote:
I think Sappho de Miranda is drawing a distinction between "knowledge" and "experience" A computer can have the knowledge, but it can't have the experience. A computer can ACT like it has experience, but it will only ever be an act, it can never actually have human experiences.

P.S. I would also think that a 13 year old would have limited experiences compared to an adult. This could explain why some judges were fooled, but that's just a guess on my part.
Yes, a computer can offer up facts and related experiences of the world.
What is missing is the first-hand view and felt experiences of a 13yr old boy living in the Ukraine.
It is this authentic experience or 'knowledge' of 'what it is like', that I would find interesting.

Yes, people can create an image, another ID and pretend; it happens all the time - people are fooled.
So what?

If there is some kind of a philo exchange which prompts a new understanding, then isn't this good enough ? Input - Output.
morganna swish
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Re: Turing Test Passed

Post by morganna swish »

P.S. I would also think that a 13 year old would have limited experiences compared to an adult. This could explain why some judges were fooled, but that's just a guess on my part.
Nah! The 'judges' were philosophical zombies from Mars, deep-fried. :wink:
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Arising_uk
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Re: Turing Test Passed

Post by Arising_uk »

Impenitent wrote:ask Eldras

-Imp
Was that the one who claimed he'd invented AI but just wasn't going to do it due to moral restraint? Or was he the loon who claimed he was an AI?

For the life of me I can't remember which forum I ran into him on?
Last edited by Arising_uk on Wed Jun 11, 2014 3:07 am, edited 1 time in total.
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