'Superdeterminism' described by John Bell

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Kuznetzova
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'Superdeterminism' described by John Bell

Post by Kuznetzova » Thu Jun 13, 2013 1:33 am

John Bell, 1985
There is a way to escape the inference of superluminal speeds and spooky action at a distance. But it involves absolute determinism in the universe, the complete absence of free will. Suppose the world is super-deterministic, with not just inanimate nature running on behind-the-scenes clockwork, but with our behavior, including our belief that we are free to choose to do one experiment rather than another, absolutely predetermined, including the "decision" by the experimenter to carry out one set of measurements rather than another, the difficulty disappears. There is no need for a faster than light signal to tell particle A what measurement has been carried out on particle B, because the universe, including particle A, already "knows" what that measurement, and its outcome, will be.
http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Superdeterminism

Ginkgo
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Re: 'Superdeterminism' described by John Bell

Post by Ginkgo » Fri Jun 14, 2013 2:07 pm

Kuznetzova wrote:John Bell, 1985
There is a way to escape the inference of superluminal speeds and spooky action at a distance. But it involves absolute determinism in the universe, the complete absence of free will. Suppose the world is super-deterministic, with not just inanimate nature running on behind-the-scenes clockwork, but with our behavior, including our belief that we are free to choose to do one experiment rather than another, absolutely predetermined, including the "decision" by the experimenter to carry out one set of measurements rather than another, the difficulty disappears. There is no need for a faster than light signal to tell particle A what measurement has been carried out on particle B, because the universe, including particle A, already "knows" what that measurement, and its outcome, will be.
http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Superdeterminism
Interesting quote. Obviously Bell is one of the few physicists that doesn't believe philosophy should be the handmaiden of physics.


Ginkgo

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