Sacrificial Systems Rooted in Crucifixion as Means to Wisdom and Understanding

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Eodnhoj7
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Re: Sacrificial Systems Rooted in Crucifixion as Means to Wisdom and Understanding

Post by Eodnhoj7 » Thu Nov 30, 2017 1:17 am

GreatandWiseTrixie wrote:
Wed Nov 29, 2017 7:21 pm
Eodnhoj7 wrote:
Tue Nov 21, 2017 2:22 am
GreatandWiseTrixie wrote:
Mon Nov 20, 2017 9:31 pm
Look, humans are a primitive, ape like race. Their customs are hard to explain. Some are just, weird.


They have this thing for sacrifice, its kind of like a fetish to them. Not the sanest species in the animal kingdom. I think it has something to do with their self-consciousness, awareness of their self comes with the ability to want to hate themselves, wanting to escape and suicidal tendencies.

All sacrificial systems embodying crucifixion and founded within a resurrection or reestablishment of being.

Also, humans are better at hating than loving... They crucified Jesus because he challenged the Status quo, jews are very about status quo, about as unliberal as unliberal can be. I heard that orthodox jews are actually more transphobic than many actual muslims.

Let me explain it like this. If humans were given them a totally random person, and they had to choose, hate them or love them, they would rather hate them, 9 times out of 10.
Equating self-sacrifice to "hate" is an act of hate in itself considering all economies (whether of a spiritual or physical nature) are bound through a transaction of the self, in various degrees, through the act of sacrfice. To hate a sacrificial system not only is to hate justice but also the transaction of being which reason is founded upon.
This is typical crazy talk you'd hear from a human being. First, they make ridiculous equalities, like 2+2=5, then followed by an absurd hyperbolic claim of 30's era political grandiosity. I applaud you for your humor.

Best not to argue, and just listen to the hilarity go on.

Exactly it is best not to argue and let your humor go on. You blame human beings for being irrational, and yet you are human right? Does that mean you are irrational?

The "Savior suffering injustice" is a common theme in many religions, if it is a common theme (along with crucifixion) what is there to argue against exactly when one is just looking at how the dots connect?

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Seleucus
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Re: Sacrificial Systems Rooted in Crucifixion as Means to Wisdom and Understanding

Post by Seleucus » Thu Nov 30, 2017 3:40 am

Eodnhoj7 wrote:
Thu Nov 30, 2017 1:13 am
Seleucus wrote:
Wed Nov 29, 2017 5:27 pm
Eodnhoj7 wrote:
Mon Nov 20, 2017 2:25 pm
Sacrifice is the common denominator found within all religions as the bond between man and God that enables any form of wisdom or understanding to be obtained.
ACIM explicitly rejects that position and insists instead that the separation never happened and therefore there was no sacrifice to repay any sins of Adam; only a sick and twisted God, which is not God's nature, would need sacrifice. It is instead ego which is mad. You might find it interesting if you haven't already to review this spiritual system?

http://stobblehouse.com/text/ACIM.pdf
ACIM position does not equate to the standard view of many religions and does not account for free will. If no seperation took place, then by default Adam and Eve would have no free will and God would be a tyrant. Love would be tyranny.

If you don't believe that then look at the nature of the seed. It must first die before it grows into a flower or a tree. Or look at a sports player who must make sacrifices in order to excel at a specific sport. Sacrifice is universal moral system.
Yes, there is no free-will/determinism debate in ACIM; Kenneth Wapnick makes this reply:

http://www.miraclestudies.net/Question36.html

EchoesOfTheHorizon
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Re: Sacrificial Systems Rooted in Crucifixion as Means to Wisdom and Understanding

Post by EchoesOfTheHorizon » Thu Nov 30, 2017 7:49 am

Eodnhoj7 wrote:
Mon Nov 20, 2017 2:25 pm
Sacrifice is the common denominator found within all religions as the bond between man and God that enables any form of wisdom or understanding to be obtained.

Certain philosophers have observed this commonality in religious figures such as:

1)Prometheus who in giving knowledge to man was crucified upon a rock only to have his entrails continually torn from him by vultures.
2)Quetzalcoatl suffered crucifixion on behalf of man.
3)The Tau cross is a universal symbol within Egyptian Mythology, the cult of Mithras, Roman and Orthodox Christianity
4)Odin crucified himself upon the world tree in order to obtain the "runes".
5)One story of Kristna claims him murdered and hung from a tree.
6)Christ's Crucifixion as the "Word of God".

Pythagoras observe the nature of the cross as having a qualitative numerical meaning to "10", observed through the Roman Numeral X, with the nature of "10" being a foundational number which synthesized itself back to 1 (as 1 + 0 = 1) much in the same manner Crucifixion universally is observed as a cycle of death and rebirth.

It is in this nature of wisdom that an inherent degree of self-sacrifice is necessary as "Of all that is written...love only what a person hath written with his blood. Write with blood, and thou wilt find that blood is spirit."(Nietzsche)

In these respects I ask: How is wisdom any different than its own sacrificial system?
Where are you getting this list from? I just tracked down the oddity of Krishna being hung from a tree (recommend heading down to Moundsville, West Virginia, Temple of Gold, it is the Innternational Society For Krishna Consciousness main North America temple complex), and I can assure you he wasn't killed in quite that fashion, had to look it up. The death described looks much closer to the arrows shot that killed St. Sebastian, or the myth of Achilles. Krishna is hardly the only one that gets killed by arrows in The Mahabharata, it could pile up to comical levels in that book. One of Krishna's merry band of hobos ended up laying on a bed of arrows, and didn't die immediately, cause he was immortal, being allowed the boon of deciding when he would die.... so took his otherwise mortal wounding in stride saying he was just going to lay back and chill for a bit.... no big rush, and couldn't exactly get up given his injuries. Neither case counts as a crucificfion.

Odin is also found hung from a tree, not just crucified. It was a early Germanic punishment to hang traitors by hanging. Jesus was likewise accused of treason of sorts by claiming to be the ruler of the earth, which Emperor Tiberius obviously had a bit of a claim to, but can't say that is the original reason Odin hung. Later on it became a case of wisdom. They had plenty of time between the Roman era when the cult of Mithras heavily influenced the Norse Religion to the recontsct with Charlegmagne's Empire to let the idea of a crucifix wisdom god seep in. The pro-Vikings in Denmark served as Auxillary to the Romans, in the very era when Mithras and Christianity had been competing in the army, and it appears Mithras won out to this gothic group.

I believe I was the first to discover the below, a few years back:

http://ambrosiasociety.org/images/p030_0_00_1.jpg

https://en.m.wikipedia.org/wiki/Mithrai ... efvert.jpg

If you look at most Roman Mythraic icons left, depicting the sacrifice of the bull, Mithras cape always extends towards the sun, and a beam from the sun reaches out to pass over it to touch Mithras, or the cape. I found this out in a matter of minutes after testing a new technique to do cross comparisons on the internet of religious myths, by picking out a very common motif or creature, in this case ravens, and doing a search for them online. In the case of the twin ravens in the cult of Mithras, I immediately found it in the Norse religion. Parallels started stacking up fast after that, and I found a Swedish historian had started noting that the cult of Mithras had some representations very crudely carved on stones in the region, as well as the occasional coins. No obvious underground cult center has been found, but it is obvious from the icon in the Eddas some Viking had come across one somewhere. I personally like the idea of a Viking breaking through a floor on accident and landing in a underground temple, looking around shocked. Romans gave them a sacrificial religion. I'm not the only one to note some of this, but I was the first as far as I know to note the eerie similarities between the art of the two.

Prometheus was chained to a rock, and not killed. Was never the intention to sacrifice him but merely to torture him. There was a competing cult (so I have read, yet to see the text it comes from) by the time of Christianity that held Prometheus as a god, followed by 12 disciples. He did suffer for mankind, but the sin was his own doing. He was not sacrificed though... tortured yes, sacrificed no.

Aztecs sacrificed just about everything. I'm not honestly knowledgeable how Quetzalcoatl died, and don't know if the images of him seemingly dragging a cross wasn't implanted by a clever catholic priest or not in early Mexico, eager to make some converts. I wouldn't be surprised one bit if he went through some blood letting, beheading, dismemberment of some sorts for everyone else's sake, for what I do know of the religion, that is more or less all they did. Doubt any society existed that was more obsessed with human sacrifice than the Aztec.

Carthage most likely sacrificed children to their gods, and the symbol of the mother goddess stretches back to Mesopotamia, but I don't see evidence of widespread child sacrifice then. Likely just started with the phonecians, a custom started after Thebes was founded as they don't do it, but when Carthage was still Phonecian centric culturally. I think that is where you meant to go with the Tau cross.

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Seleucus
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Re: Sacrificial Systems Rooted in Crucifixion as Means to Wisdom and Understanding

Post by Seleucus » Thu Nov 30, 2017 8:10 am

EchoesOfTheHorizon wrote:
Thu Nov 30, 2017 7:49 am

I believe I was the first to discover the below, a few years back:

http://ambrosiasociety.org/images/p030_0_00_1.jpg

https://en.m.wikipedia.org/wiki/Mithrai ... efvert.jpg

If you look at most Roman Mythraic icons left, depicting the sacrifice of the bull, Mithras cape always
I'm inclined to think that sun is the ancient Babylonian sun (and moon) which then becomes the Vergina Sun and also the star in the Islamic crescent moon logo.

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GreatandWiseTrixie
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Re: Sacrificial Systems Rooted in Crucifixion as Means to Wisdom and Understanding

Post by GreatandWiseTrixie » Thu Nov 30, 2017 9:14 am

Eodnhoj7 wrote:
Thu Nov 30, 2017 1:17 am
GreatandWiseTrixie wrote:
Wed Nov 29, 2017 7:21 pm
Eodnhoj7 wrote:
Tue Nov 21, 2017 2:22 am

Equating self-sacrifice to "hate" is an act of hate in itself considering all economies (whether of a spiritual or physical nature) are bound through a transaction of the self, in various degrees, through the act of sacrfice. To hate a sacrificial system not only is to hate justice but also the transaction of being which reason is founded upon.
This is typical crazy talk you'd hear from a human being. First, they make ridiculous equalities, like 2+2=5, then followed by an absurd hyperbolic claim of 30's era political grandiosity. I applaud you for your humor.

Best not to argue, and just listen to the hilarity go on.

Exactly it is best not to argue and let your humor go on. You blame human beings for being irrational, and yet you are human right? Does that mean you are irrational?

The "Savior suffering injustice" is a common theme in many religions, if it is a common theme (along with crucifixion) what is there to argue against exactly when one is just looking at how the dots connect?
crucifixion systems are stupid barbaric and backwards, and the only wisdom youll get from it is that humans are a primitive ape-like race of vultures and savages who are resistant to progress.

fun fact about rome, they crucify murderers and rapists, but did you know rome was founded on rape, rome didnt have any men so they took a city invited them to rome, murdered all the men and raped all the women.
but then they say murder and rape is a crime, total hypocrits just like the rest of the human race.

people praise rome like it was some great accomplishment, look upon the city with venerable adoration, but when some random criminal in poverty rapes a girl to get some pussy everybody loses their minds. but if an entire city is raped, then everybody views it as some great heroic accomplishment.

EchoesOfTheHorizon
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Re: Sacrificial Systems Rooted in Crucifixion as Means to Wisdom and Understanding

Post by EchoesOfTheHorizon » Thu Nov 30, 2017 10:15 am

Seleucus wrote:
Thu Nov 30, 2017 8:10 am
EchoesOfTheHorizon wrote:
Thu Nov 30, 2017 7:49 am

I believe I was the first to discover the below, a few years back:

http://ambrosiasociety.org/images/p030_0_00_1.jpg

https://en.m.wikipedia.org/wiki/Mithrai ... efvert.jpg

If you look at most Roman Mythraic icons left, depicting the sacrifice of the bull, Mithras cape always
I'm inclined to think that sun is the ancient Babylonian sun (and moon) which then becomes the Vergina Sun and also the star in the Islamic crescent moon logo.
Okay.... I'm willing to consider evidence for this if you have it. I know inclined doesn't necessarily mean evidence, but I'm not able to see a path foreward for this.

A lot of evidence exists that the cult of Mithras got it's start around Perganum, a Stoic hotbed in Asia Minor. Not everyone is on board with this theory, but a lot of studies have been made on this subject. Earliest evidence for the cult from Roman point of view with the war against Mithridates, the soldiers, pirates and naval forces had some of the early beliefs. A lot of the bee cults shortly afterwards across the islands of the Roman world continued this tradition.

As far as Archeology is concerned, I traced elements of this not to Iran, but Georgia at the earliest, and by elements, I mean just that, elements, not a full blown religion. I had for a long time focused on Antioch, and the Assyrian influence of the region, but over time had to tone that down, Dionysius perhaps, but not the earliest phase of Mirthras.

I can't rule out a link between the Astrology and Islam, but the only place where the cult of Mithras still exists in any form is in Iraqi Kurdistan, and the local priesthood doesn't seem too obviously aware of a early Arab pagan link. The bull might have a connection to Sin (the moon God) but that is a unsubstantiated jump I'm not willing to take.

Only reason I could go with my initial findings of the google image search for the crows, was because ALOT matches up, more than I listed here. I thought using this technique, I would find a bunch more, but haven't really stuck gold that hard since. I try to avoid parallelomania by mixing my techniques, and actively seeking out ideas to discredit my findings. It is easy to find parallels to many things in old myths, and claim a conspiracy, linear descent, or shared origins. I can be intrigued by a idea seemingly linked across a few cultures, but it has to be followed then after by a very exhausting search. I go through old glosses tracking down locations of loss temples mentioned in a text or two, elements of religion, then try to figure out migration routes for the idea by neighboring peoples with similar ideas, preferably identical. It can take years. My Norse-Mithras idea isn't full proof get. Greater than 50%, given it has more and more evidence by others backing it, but who knows, people get stuff wrong sometimes, and can't rule it out I can be wrong and just don't grasp why. This being said.... fairly certain I'm right. Not enough to bet my life on it, but I'll bet the life of a sign language talking, beloved monkey on it. I'm about that certain (nice analogy for the sacrifice thread).

https://en.m.wikipedia.org/wiki/Parallelomania

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Eodnhoj7
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Re: Sacrificial Systems Rooted in Crucifixion as Means to Wisdom and Understanding

Post by Eodnhoj7 » Thu Nov 30, 2017 5:12 pm

Seleucus wrote:
Thu Nov 30, 2017 3:40 am
Eodnhoj7 wrote:
Thu Nov 30, 2017 1:13 am
Seleucus wrote:
Wed Nov 29, 2017 5:27 pm

ACIM explicitly rejects that position and insists instead that the separation never happened and therefore there was no sacrifice to repay any sins of Adam; only a sick and twisted God, which is not God's nature, would need sacrifice. It is instead ego which is mad. You might find it interesting if you haven't already to review this spiritual system?

http://stobblehouse.com/text/ACIM.pdf
ACIM position does not equate to the standard view of many religions and does not account for free will. If no seperation took place, then by default Adam and Eve would have no free will and God would be a tyrant. Love would be tyranny.

If you don't believe that then look at the nature of the seed. It must first die before it grows into a flower or a tree. Or look at a sports player who must make sacrifices in order to excel at a specific sport. Sacrifice is universal moral system.
Yes, there is no free-will/determinism debate in ACIM; Kenneth Wapnick makes this reply:

http://www.miraclestudies.net/Question36.html
The nature of free will is not limited strictly just to heaven, but to a a multitude of dimensions (hell, reincarnation/purgatory) which are mediate through earth. Considering heaven, for all we understand of it, may be viewed as a unified and singular dimension as one moment the nature of choice would not take on a temporal reality (where we are in a situation where continuous choices must be made)

The nature of choice in heaven is not strictly eradicated either if viewed as a temporary state (such as the position taken by some elements of Buddhism if memory serves).

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Seleucus
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Re: Sacrificial Systems Rooted in Crucifixion as Means to Wisdom and Understanding

Post by Seleucus » Thu Nov 30, 2017 5:16 pm

EchoesOfTheHorizon wrote:
Thu Nov 30, 2017 10:15 am
Seleucus wrote:
Thu Nov 30, 2017 8:10 am
EchoesOfTheHorizon wrote:
Thu Nov 30, 2017 7:49 am

I believe I was the first to discover the below, a few years back:

http://ambrosiasociety.org/images/p030_0_00_1.jpg

https://en.m.wikipedia.org/wiki/Mithrai ... efvert.jpg

If you look at most Roman Mythraic icons left, depicting the sacrifice of the bull, Mithras cape always
I'm inclined to think that sun is the ancient Babylonian sun (and moon) which then becomes the Vergina Sun and also the star in the Islamic crescent moon logo.
Okay.... I'm willing to consider evidence for this if you have it. I know inclined doesn't necessarily mean evidence, but I'm not able to see a path foreward for this.
Look here at the stela in the slide at minute 1:00 or also 16:00, https://youtu.be/0nBpeIZ3KL8

This sun goes together with a moon and is presumably the symbol of power picked up and that eventually becomes the Vergina Sun and Crescent and star.

Since there's probably no more interesting fellow about to ask, be it off topic, what's your theory of the Voynich Manuscript?

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Eodnhoj7
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Re: Sacrificial Systems Rooted in Crucifixion as Means to Wisdom and Understanding

Post by Eodnhoj7 » Thu Nov 30, 2017 5:44 pm

EchoesOfTheHorizon wrote:
Thu Nov 30, 2017 7:49 am
Eodnhoj7 wrote:
Mon Nov 20, 2017 2:25 pm
Sacrifice is the common denominator found within all religions as the bond between man and God that enables any form of wisdom or understanding to be obtained.

Certain philosophers have observed this commonality in religious figures such as:

1)Prometheus who in giving knowledge to man was crucified upon a rock only to have his entrails continually torn from him by vultures.
2)Quetzalcoatl suffered crucifixion on behalf of man.
3)The Tau cross is a universal symbol within Egyptian Mythology, the cult of Mithras, Roman and Orthodox Christianity
4)Odin crucified himself upon the world tree in order to obtain the "runes".
5)One story of Kristna claims him murdered and hung from a tree.
6)Christ's Crucifixion as the "Word of God".

Pythagoras observe the nature of the cross as having a qualitative numerical meaning to "10", observed through the Roman Numeral X, with the nature of "10" being a foundational number which synthesized itself back to 1 (as 1 + 0 = 1) much in the same manner Crucifixion universally is observed as a cycle of death and rebirth.

It is in this nature of wisdom that an inherent degree of self-sacrifice is necessary as "Of all that is written...love only what a person hath written with his blood. Write with blood, and thou wilt find that blood is spirit."(Nietzsche)

In these respects I ask: How is wisdom any different than its own sacrificial system?
Where are you getting this list from? I just tracked down the oddity of Krishna being hung from a tree (recommend heading down to Moundsville, West Virginia, Temple of Gold, it is the Innternational Society For Krishna Consciousness main North America temple complex), and I can assure you he wasn't killed in quite that fashion, had to look it up

It was death by arrows. However the nature of crucifixion, as being tied or nailed has many characteristics to hanging. So I can reword crucifixion with hanging instead or use crucifixion/hanging as the title. However, considering both use some form of "tree" (whether natural or of an artificial quality [cross]) in which the victim is hung in a vulnerable manner until death, the term crucifixion would suffice, however if you want to use "hanging" that also works.

. The death described looks much closer to the arrows shot that killed St. Sebastian, or the myth of Achilles. Krishna is hardly the only one that gets killed by arrows in The Mahabharata, it could pile up to comical levels in that book. One of Krishna's merry band of hobos ended up laying on a bed of arrows, and didn't die immediately, cause he was immortal, being allowed the boon of deciding when he would die.... so took his otherwise mortal wounding in stride saying he was just going to lay back and chill for a bit.... no big rush, and couldn't exactly get up given his injuries. Neither case counts as a crucificfion.

Odin is also found hung from a tree, not just crucified. It was a early Germanic punishment to hang traitors by hanging. Jesus was likewise accused of treason of sorts by claiming to be the ruler of the earth, which Emperor Tiberius obviously had a bit of a claim to, but can't say that is the original reason Odin hung.
I am not arguing that Jesus' crucifixion caused the hanging/crucifixion of Odin (or even Quetzocoatal for that matter) or vice a versa, but rather there is some universal form within the human construct where the act of crucifixion (as hanging from a real or artificially constructed tree) appears to have some universal form in regards to the nature of the human experience and God(s) responsible for "wisdom" and "understanding".


Later on it became a case of wisdom.

Actually that does not explain the problem of Quetzocoatal's crucifixion, or even prometheus's version from a rock as these deities were seperate or existed prior to the cult of Mithras.

They had plenty of time between the Roman era when the cult of Mithras heavily influenced the Norse Religion to the recontsct with Charlegmagne's Empire to let the idea of a crucifix wisdom god seep in. The pro-Vikings in Denmark served as Auxillary to the Romans, in the very era when Mithras and Christianity had been competing in the army, and it appears Mithras won out to this gothic group.

I believe I was the first to discover the below, a few years back:

http://ambrosiasociety.org/images/p030_0_00_1.jpg

That picture has been around for a while, I have seen it elsewhere. If memory serves it would be the medieval equivalent of how scholars at the time viewed deities such as angels etc. It was medieval art looking into the past from a medieval perspective.

"Although the English kingdoms were converted as a result of Christianization of the Germanic peoples by the 7th century, Odin is frequently listed as a founding figure among the Old English royalty.[7] He is also either directly or indirectly mentioned a few times in the surviving Old English poetic corpus, including the Nine Herbs Charm and likely also the Old English rune poem. Odin may also be referenced in the riddle Solomon and Saturn. In the Nine Herbs Charm, Odin is said to have slain a wyrm by way of nine "glory twigs". Preserved from an 11th-century manuscript, the poem is, according to Bill Griffiths, "one of the most enigmatic of Old English texts". The section including Odin is as follows:"

Old English:
+ wyrm com snican, toslat he nan,
ða genam woden VIIII wuldortanas,
sloh ða þa næddran þæt heo on VIIII tofleah
Þær gaændade æppel and attor
þæt heo næfre ne wolde on hus bugan.[8]

Bill Griffiths translation:
A serpent came crawling (but) it destroyed no one
when Woden took nine twigs of glory,
(and) then struck the adder so that it flew into nine (pieces).
There archived apple and poison
that it never would re-enter the house.[8]


The emendation of nan to 'man' has been proposed. The next stanza comments on the creation of the herbs chervil and fennel while hanging in heaven by the 'wise lord' (witig drihten) and before sending them down among mankind. Regarding this, Griffith comments that "In a Christian context 'hanging in heaven' would refer to the crucifixion; but (remembering that Woden was mentioned a few lines previously) there is also a parallel, perhaps a better one, with Odin, as his crucifixion was associated with learning."[8] The Old English gnomic poem Maxims I also mentions Odin by name in the (alliterative) phrase Woden worhte weos, 'Woden made idols'), in which he is contrasted with and denounced against the Christian God.[9]


https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Odin

https://en.m.wikipedia.org/wiki/Mithrai ... efvert.jpg



The concept of Odin was around the same time and possibly prior to the Mithras Cult:

"The earliest records of the Germanic peoples were recorded by the Romans, and in these works Odin is frequently referred to—via a process known as interpretatio romana (where characteristics perceived to be similar by Romans result in identification of a non-Roman god as a Roman deity)—as the Roman god Mercury. The first clear example of this occurs in the Roman historian Tacitus's late 1st-century work Germania, where, writing about the religion of the Suebi (a confederation of Germanic peoples), he comments that "among the gods Mercury is the one they principally worship. They regard it as a religious duty to offer to him, on fixed days, human as well as other sacrificial victims. Hercules and Mars they appease by animal offerings of the permitted kind" and adds that a portion of the Suebi also venerate "Isis". In this instance, Tacitus refers to the god Odin as "Mercury", Thor as "Hercules", and Týr as "Mars", and the identity of the "Isis" of the Suebi has been debated.[5]"



If you look at most Roman Mythraic icons left, depicting the sacrifice of the bull, Mithras cape always extends towards the sun, and a beam from the sun reaches out to pass over it to touch Mithras, or the cape. I found this out in a matter of minutes after testing a new technique to do cross comparisons on the internet of religious myths, by picking out a very common motif or creature, in this case ravens, and doing a search for them online. In the case of the twin ravens in the cult of Mithras, I immediately found it in the Norse religion. Parallels started stacking up fast after that, and I found a Swedish historian had started noting that the cult of Mithras had some representations very crudely carved on stones in the region, as well as the occasional coins. No obvious underground cult center has been found, but it is obvious from the icon in the Eddas some Viking had come across one somewhere. I personally like the idea of a Viking breaking through a floor on accident and landing in a underground temple, looking around shocked. Romans gave them a sacrificial religion. I'm not the only one to note some of this, but I was the first as far as I know to note the eerie similarities between the art of the two.

Prometheus was chained to a rock, and not killed. Was never the intention to sacrifice him but merely to torture him.
Prometheus receieved his punishment as a result of giving wisdom to humans (through fire) against the will of the gods. His punishment, as a sacrifice, is an inevitable result of taking the role of a "savior" (now whether he could be considered one is a separate argument altogether).

There was a competing cult (so I have read, yet to see the text it comes from) by the time of Christianity that held Prometheus as a god, followed by 12 disciples. He did suffer for mankind, but the sin was his own doing. He was not sacrificed though... tortured yes, sacrificed no.
Considering all "crucified saviors" resurrect in some form or another, the act of death as a sacrifice has very little difference than sacrifice as torture, considering these crucified saviors inevitably resurrect.


Aztecs sacrificed just about everything. I'm not honestly knowledgeable how Quetzalcoatl died, and don't know if the images of him seemingly dragging a cross wasn't implanted by a clever catholic priest or not in early Mexico, eager to make some converts.
Some sources, taken with a grain of salt, argue that the catholic priests were "confused" when having to preach to these people considering the similiarities they found between their God and Roman Catholicism.

I wouldn't be surprised one bit if he went through some blood letting, beheading, dismemberment of some sorts for everyone else's sake, for what I do know of the religion, that is more or less all they did. Doubt any society existed that was more obsessed with human sacrifice than the Aztec.

The heavy sacrifice, was implied, as towards the end of their empire. Cultures about to die commit to a heavy extermination of their populace in some way shape or form, such as America with the abortion epidemic.

Carthage most likely sacrificed children to their gods, and the symbol of the mother goddess stretches back to Mesopotamia, but I don't see evidence of widespread child sacrifice then. Likely just started with the phonecians, a custom started after Thebes was founded as they don't do it, but when Carthage was still Phonecian centric culturally. I think that is where you meant to go with the Tau cross.

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Eodnhoj7
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Re: Sacrificial Systems Rooted in Crucifixion as Means to Wisdom and Understanding

Post by Eodnhoj7 » Thu Nov 30, 2017 5:46 pm

Seleucus wrote:
Thu Nov 30, 2017 8:10 am
EchoesOfTheHorizon wrote:
Thu Nov 30, 2017 7:49 am

I believe I was the first to discover the below, a few years back:

http://ambrosiasociety.org/images/p030_0_00_1.jpg

https://en.m.wikipedia.org/wiki/Mithrai ... efvert.jpg

If you look at most Roman Mythraic icons left, depicting the sacrifice of the bull, Mithras cape always
I'm inclined to think that sun is the ancient Babylonian sun (and moon) which then becomes the Vergina Sun and also the star in the Islamic crescent moon logo.
There are common factors. Here is a thread that may give some information in regards to that subject:

Sphere Worship

viewtopic.php?f=11&t=23082

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