Search found 51 matches

by romanv
Mon Nov 19, 2018 10:06 am
Forum: Political Philosophy
Topic: The Ability to Formally Withhold Consent at Elections Leads to Real Democracy and Maximises the Common Good
Replies: 117
Views: 2907

Re: The Ability to Formally Withhold Consent at Elections Leads to Real Democracy and Maximises the Common Good

Yes that is exactly what it does, it ensures a consensus of 50+%. If you think that is a bad idea, then well, ok. Then oboviously you think democracy is a bad idea. Good luck on finding rulers to be nice to you. It's neither a good idea nor a bad idea. Inaction can be just as harmful as action and ...
by romanv
Mon Nov 19, 2018 8:31 am
Forum: Political Philosophy
Topic: The Ability to Formally Withhold Consent at Elections Leads to Real Democracy and Maximises the Common Good
Replies: 117
Views: 2907

Re: The Ability to Formally Withhold Consent at Elections Leads to Real Democracy and Maximises the Common Good

Democracy makes many of the rights in in the US constitution inviolate, matter how many people vote for abolishing them. How? What is the mechanism by which the population has the general right to vote OR exercise their NOTA right, but the inability to vote on particulars like abolishing rights? Al...
by romanv
Mon Nov 19, 2018 8:27 am
Forum: Political Philosophy
Topic: The Ability to Formally Withhold Consent at Elections Leads to Real Democracy and Maximises the Common Good
Replies: 117
Views: 2907

Re: The Ability to Formally Withhold Consent at Elections Leads to Real Democracy and Maximises the Common Good

Democracy makes many of the rights in in the US constitution inviolate, matter how many people vote for abolishing them. How? What is the mechanism by which the population has the general right to vote, but the inability to vote on particulars like abolishing rights? I have gone through the concept...
by romanv
Mon Nov 19, 2018 8:15 am
Forum: Political Philosophy
Topic: The Ability to Formally Withhold Consent at Elections Leads to Real Democracy and Maximises the Common Good
Replies: 117
Views: 2907

Re: The Ability to Formally Withhold Consent at Elections Leads to Real Democracy and Maximises the Common Good

I am arguing in good faith and I am adhering to the axioms of probability theory: P(A) ≥ P(A & B). Which can be deduced from predicate logic. IF A ∧ B => ⊤ THEN A => ⊤ AND B => ⊤ A = People are allowed to vote B = People are allowed to vote on X So I have taken your QUALIFIED (A ∧ B) statement and ...
by romanv
Mon Nov 19, 2018 2:20 am
Forum: Political Philosophy
Topic: The Ability to Formally Withhold Consent at Elections Leads to Real Democracy and Maximises the Common Good
Replies: 117
Views: 2907

Re: The Ability to Formally Withhold Consent at Elections Leads to Real Democracy and Maximises the Common Good

You are not arguing in good faith. This is the full quote. You have it backward. Your rights cannot be stripped from you in a democracy, even if everyone, including you, voted for it. In a democracy no-one has the power. I am arguing in good faith and I am adhering to the axioms of probability theo...
by romanv
Sun Nov 18, 2018 11:09 am
Forum: Political Philosophy
Topic: The Ability to Formally Withhold Consent at Elections Leads to Real Democracy and Maximises the Common Good
Replies: 117
Views: 2907

Re: The Ability to Formally Withhold Consent at Elections Leads to Real Democracy and Maximises the Common Good

In a democracy no-one has the power A system where the people's will has no power over government sounds like a dictatorship. You are not arguing in good faith. This is the full quote. You have it backward. Your rights cannot be stripped from you in a democracy, even if everyone, including you, vot...
by romanv
Sat Nov 17, 2018 12:38 am
Forum: Political Philosophy
Topic: The Ability to Formally Withhold Consent at Elections Leads to Real Democracy and Maximises the Common Good
Replies: 117
Views: 2907

Re: The Ability to Formally Withhold Consent at Elections Leads to Real Democracy and Maximises the Common Good

I see a meta-problem on the horizon: selling the idea of NOTA to those who disagree with you. For instance, those who currently have the power to accept or reject NOTA would have to be convinced of the benefits for themselves. It's a question of WIFI (What's in it for the incumbents?). Why would th...
by romanv
Sat Nov 17, 2018 12:35 am
Forum: Political Philosophy
Topic: The Ability to Formally Withhold Consent at Elections Leads to Real Democracy and Maximises the Common Good
Replies: 117
Views: 2907

Re: The Ability to Formally Withhold Consent at Elections Leads to Real Democracy and Maximises the Common Good

I just think that—potentially a significant number of—NOTA voters will simply abstain. I think this is a realistic question. Will people use it? Surveys that obtain the reasons why people don't vote indicate a large number don't as they many think it wont change anything, or there is no-one who wil...
by romanv
Sat Nov 17, 2018 12:17 am
Forum: Political Philosophy
Topic: The Ability to Formally Withhold Consent at Elections Leads to Real Democracy and Maximises the Common Good
Replies: 117
Views: 2907

Re:

"I totally agree with your sentiment" As I do with yours. Certainly, I hope I'm wrong. Adopting a binding none of the above across the board would be the single most effective reform imaginable. Unfortunately, because NOTA would be so effective, I'm thinkin' we'll never see it in place. Again: I ho...
by romanv
Sat Nov 17, 2018 12:14 am
Forum: Political Philosophy
Topic: The Ability to Formally Withhold Consent at Elections Leads to Real Democracy and Maximises the Common Good
Replies: 117
Views: 2907

Re: The Ability to Formally Withhold Consent at Elections Leads to Real Democracy and Maximises the Common Good

If your rights can be stripped then it is not a democracy. In a real democracy the power of the state rests on your rights Yeah. No. In a democracy the power of the state rests on OUR rights. The state may not have the power to strip YOUR rights at this very moment, but at any moment the majority h...
by romanv
Fri Nov 16, 2018 1:00 pm
Forum: Political Philosophy
Topic: Democracy is a logical fallacy
Replies: 56
Views: 1585

Re: Democracy is a logical fallacy

Democracy = Majority is always right. This is the reason I am not a democrat, and never will be. I do believe in the right to speak against the government, and even the right to challenge the opinions of the majority of people. Socrates was executed because the majority thought he deserved no right...
by romanv
Fri Nov 16, 2018 4:49 am
Forum: Political Philosophy
Topic: The Ability to Formally Withhold Consent at Elections Leads to Real Democracy and Maximises the Common Good
Replies: 117
Views: 2907

Re: The Ability to Formally Withhold Consent at Elections Leads to Real Democracy and Maximises the Common Good

Impenitent wrote:
Thu Nov 15, 2018 10:43 pm
rights? the only thing that guarantees rights is superior firepower.

-Imp

NOTA is a howitzer under our control, and ties the hands of our opponents behind their backs, blindfolds them, and puts a cigarette in their mouths, and stands them in our LOF. Anyone on our side is safe.
by romanv
Fri Nov 16, 2018 4:46 am
Forum: Political Philosophy
Topic: The Ability to Formally Withhold Consent at Elections Leads to Real Democracy and Maximises the Common Good
Replies: 117
Views: 2907

Re: The Ability to Formally Withhold Consent at Elections Leads to Real Democracy and Maximises the Common Good

That cant happen in a real democracy. If the state derives its power from its citizens, that means citizens must have power to give, to have power they must be free. If they are free they must have rights eg right to free expression, right to live without discrimination, innocent until proven guilt...
by romanv
Fri Nov 16, 2018 4:40 am
Forum: Political Philosophy
Topic: The Ability to Formally Withhold Consent at Elections Leads to Real Democracy and Maximises the Common Good
Replies: 117
Views: 2907

Re: The Ability to Formally Withhold Consent at Elections Leads to Real Democracy and Maximises the Common Good

Well put. The problem remains, however, that, once elected, the representatives will operate autonomously, unless constituents are polled on every piece of legislation that requires the representatives to vote. Well that is an inherent characteristic of an electoral democracy. I personally would li...
by romanv
Fri Nov 16, 2018 4:03 am
Forum: Political Philosophy
Topic: The Ability to Formally Withhold Consent at Elections Leads to Real Democracy and Maximises the Common Good
Replies: 117
Views: 2907

Re: The Ability to Formally Withhold Consent at Elections Leads to Real Democracy and Maximises the Common Good

The English equivalent to Wyoming would be Watford. Imo anyway. :roll: What's up with Watford? If the US was a pure democracy, Wyomingians would be outvoted for the use of their land. For city slickers, out of sight, out of mind, and NIMBY (not in my backyard). Locals do lose autonomy another way. ...