Search found 1400 matches

by Scott Mayers
Thu Jul 16, 2015 11:47 am
Forum: Applied Ethics
Topic: Do we have the right to tax people in order to help the poor?
Replies: 209
Views: 17932

Re: Do we have the right to tax people in order to help the poor?

On tax discussions, I'm annoyed that those who complain against taxation as being 'fair' don't defend how 'fair' it is that anyone's wealth is determined by either (a) "ownership" derived by some original declaration of being first to pee on some fixed and limited property, (b) "ownership" derived b...
by Scott Mayers
Thu Jul 16, 2015 11:05 am
Forum: Philosophy of Science
Topic: Gravity, Time and Leibniz.
Replies: 82
Views: 7069

Re: Gravity, Time and Leibniz.

I know that Plato discussed the concept of "absolutes" to which relate to this but I don't recall anywhere of which time was considered as being or requiring an absolute 'atom'. And if it was, it still would reduce to being perceived indistinguishable to a moment (period of measure for time) that h...
by Scott Mayers
Thu Jul 16, 2015 10:50 am
Forum: Philosophy of Science
Topic: Gravity, Time and Leibniz.
Replies: 82
Views: 7069

Re: Gravity, Time and Leibniz.

I already don't propose any absolute minimum OR that should there be one, it is not meaningful to interpret except as akin to a spacial point in light of Euclid's postulate of a point as being "that which has no space". You'll note that in the Standard Model the sub-atomic particles are also modell...
by Scott Mayers
Thu Jul 16, 2015 10:10 am
Forum: Philosophy of Science
Topic: Gravity, Time and Leibniz.
Replies: 82
Views: 7069

Re: Gravity, Time and Leibniz.

, you now assert that "the minimum possible interval of time could not possibly have an absolute value..." yet then reassert that just such an absolute exists as it was 'known' from ancient philosophers (those pre-Socratics et al). Again, this at least appears contradictory. This is where gravity c...
by Scott Mayers
Thu Jul 16, 2015 8:27 am
Forum: Philosophy of Science
Topic: Gravity, Time and Leibniz.
Replies: 82
Views: 7069

Re: Gravity, Time and Leibniz.

Time is the aether. I don't mind this way of looking at it either because at least time is physical. Time can appear to bend light, for instance. Because it is you who is interpreting this uniquely, This I'm not denying. I've said all along that the evidence is not what is in question but rather I'...
by Scott Mayers
Thu Jul 16, 2015 6:37 am
Forum: Philosophy of Religion
Topic: Do you think that torturing a baby is ever justified?
Replies: 54
Views: 4627

Re: Do you think that torturing a baby is ever justified?

Do you think that torturing a baby is ever justified? Have you seen this rather well done movie? https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=dx7irFN2gdI They end asking about a God who tortures babies as God did to King David’s baby. God also killed many innocent babies in his great flood as well as the innoce...
by Scott Mayers
Thu Jul 16, 2015 5:58 am
Forum: Philosophy of Science
Topic: Gravity, Time and Leibniz.
Replies: 82
Views: 7069

Re: Gravity, Time and Leibniz.

petm1 wrote:Time is the aether.
I actually agree depending on interpretation. To me, the 'fourth' dimension beyond the three of space is equivalently interpreted as each point expanding. This simultaneously defines 'change' to which 'time' is implied.
by Scott Mayers
Thu Jul 16, 2015 5:37 am
Forum: Philosophy of Science
Topic: Gravity, Time and Leibniz.
Replies: 82
Views: 7069

Re: Gravity, Time and Leibniz.

But you asserted before that you believe in an absolute minimal time quantity you referred to as the Planck Interval. This is not quite what I said. In fact I insisted that the minimum possible interval of time could not possibly have an absolute value because it was gravity-dependent. It is SR whi...
by Scott Mayers
Thu Jul 16, 2015 4:48 am
Forum: Epistemology - Theory of Knowledge
Topic: Questions for the friends of qualia.
Replies: 154
Views: 13416

Re: Questions for the friends of qualia.

I think the problem is resolved if we reduce the idea of 'qualia' to how the brain likely stores its data. Although I don't provide a precise means for this inside the brain, it can be described logically by analogy to 'C Computer Language' thing called a structure . To define this, you begin by pr...
by Scott Mayers
Thu Jul 16, 2015 4:33 am
Forum: Philosophy of Science
Topic: Gravity, Time and Leibniz.
Replies: 82
Views: 7069

Re: Gravity, Time and Leibniz.

Okay, I just looked at the Wikipedia entry. You are definitely misinterpreting this. What sort of bullshit statement is this to make in a philosophy forum? This is the sort of hubris usually reserved for physicists who always claim that there's only one way to interpret evidence until they change t...
by Scott Mayers
Thu Jul 16, 2015 3:50 am
Forum: Logic and Philosophy of Mathematics
Topic: Plato's Theory of Forms...
Replies: 84
Views: 5853

Plato's Theory of Forms...

I've read all of Plato's works a long time ago and the most surprising thing to me at the time on learning of these ancient philosophies how much of what we think and discuss today was as already discovered and rediscovered again and again. What bothers me is how each new generation of philosophy te...
by Scott Mayers
Thu Jul 16, 2015 3:08 am
Forum: Philosophy of Science
Topic: Gravity, Time and Leibniz.
Replies: 82
Views: 7069

Re: Gravity, Time and Leibniz.

On Platonic "forms", I'm going to seek out a discussion on this site OR begin a separate thread on the topic.
by Scott Mayers
Thu Jul 16, 2015 2:59 am
Forum: Philosophy of Science
Topic: Gravity, Time and Leibniz.
Replies: 82
Views: 7069

Re: Gravity, Time and Leibniz.

Okay, I just looked at the Wikipedia entry. You are definitely misinterpreting this. From there, Because the Planck time comes from dimensional analysis, which ignores constant factors, there is no reason to believe that exactly one unit of Planck time has any special physical significance. Rather, ...
by Scott Mayers
Thu Jul 16, 2015 2:50 am
Forum: Philosophy of Science
Topic: Gravity, Time and Leibniz.
Replies: 82
Views: 7069

Re: Gravity, Time and Leibniz.

If time had an absolute minimum measure, even this 'quantized' size would have to act in discrete 'jumps' as unit time in wholes and appear indistinct as a point without time. That is, you couldn't have a continuous flow to the next moment without begging that each new moment consists of degrees of...
by Scott Mayers
Wed Jul 15, 2015 4:08 am
Forum: Philosophy of Science
Topic: Gravity, Time and Leibniz.
Replies: 82
Views: 7069

Re: Gravity, Time and Leibniz.

Time is a measure of continuous 'moments' but unless you define a 'moment' as always consisting of some minimal absolute unit, This was already done a century ago. Time does have a minimum possible unit value called the Planck interval and it has been very precisely calculated as 5.4 x 10(-44) seco...