Search found 14 matches

by akuma's chamber
Thu Oct 20, 2016 3:47 pm
Forum: Logic and Philosophy of Mathematics
Topic: Was math invented or discovered?
Replies: 77
Views: 9731

Re: Was math invented or discovered?

Both . . . kinda It's a way of talking about our experience with/how we think about relations, in a highly abstract way. We don't literally "invent" how we think about relations in this abstract way--it's a factor of how our brains work, and it has to be consistent with how we experience the world,...
by akuma's chamber
Thu Sep 29, 2016 2:03 pm
Forum: General Philosophical Discussion
Topic: Phenomenological data and absolute certainty
Replies: 21
Views: 2615

Re: Phenomenological data and absolute certainty

I wasn't clear enough, but I suspect I haven't thought this out very well. I meant that Quine uses "ontology" (lower case) to differentiate people's perspectives on being/existence in relation to the subject/branch of philosophy called "Ontology". But that's what the branch of philosophy called "On...
by akuma's chamber
Thu Sep 29, 2016 2:01 pm
Forum: General Philosophical Discussion
Topic: Phenomenological data and absolute certainty
Replies: 21
Views: 2615

Re: Phenomenological data and absolute certainty

Ah, okay. That makes sense. I've talked about this a number of times in a number of different milieus over the years. What I've often done is challenged folks to explain how present phenomenal data, as present phenomenal data, not as something that corresponds or not to something else, could be mis...
by akuma's chamber
Thu Sep 29, 2016 1:55 pm
Forum: General Philosophical Discussion
Topic: Phenomenological data and absolute certainty
Replies: 21
Views: 2615

Re: Phenomenological data and absolute certainty

Erm, one of us doesn't know what Ontology means. In keeping with the theme of this discussion, I am open to persuasion about which of us that may be. Well I intentionally used "ontology" there to differentiate it from "Ontology" with a capital "O", similar to how Quine employs it in his "On What Th...
by akuma's chamber
Thu Sep 29, 2016 1:42 pm
Forum: General Philosophical Discussion
Topic: Phenomenological data and absolute certainty
Replies: 21
Views: 2615

Re: Phenomenological data and absolute certainty

1 a priori (deduction), 2 a posteriori (induction), and 3 phenomenological experience. As Hobbes pointed out, a priori isn't the same as deduction, and a posteriori doesn't conventionally refer to induction-only. The prior/posterior distinction there is with respect to experience. A posteriori is o...
by akuma's chamber
Thu Sep 29, 2016 1:34 pm
Forum: General Philosophical Discussion
Topic: Phenomenological data and absolute certainty
Replies: 21
Views: 2615

Re: Phenomenological data and absolute certainty

Absolute certainty is possible only via phenomenological sense-perception in any present moment (that is, sense-perception not separated by time). For example, "I am aware that some experience is occurring as I type this," or "I sense things in this moment". * Do you disagree? I agree with that and...
by akuma's chamber
Thu Sep 29, 2016 11:32 am
Forum: Philosophy of Mind
Topic: Subconscious mind?
Replies: 44
Views: 5991

Re: Subconscious mind?

I think this depends on what subconscious mind refers to. A There's the Freudian type where a subconscious (and unconscious) mind operate similarly to a conscious mind except we're not aware of it. B Or there's the type where the subconscious mind refers to brain states that operate habitually via ...
by akuma's chamber
Thu Sep 29, 2016 11:22 am
Forum: General Philosophical Discussion
Topic: Phenomenological data and absolute certainty
Replies: 21
Views: 2615

Re: Phenomenological data and absolute certainty

Also, my ontology (that is, the network of my philosophical ideas) Erm, one of us doesn't know what Ontology means. In keeping with the theme of this discussion, I am open to persuasion about which of us that may be. Well I intentionally used "ontology" there to differentiate it from "Ontology" wit...
by akuma's chamber
Tue Sep 27, 2016 10:05 pm
Forum: General Philosophical Discussion
Topic: Phenomenological data and absolute certainty
Replies: 21
Views: 2615

Re: Phenomenological data and absolute certainty

A priori is not the same as deduction, nor a posteriori induction. Phenomena are things experienced and inform posteriori. But since you have opened with the usual solipsism, you have no right to assert any kind of certainty. Sure, but isn't deduction a method for establishing truth-preserving argu...
by akuma's chamber
Tue Sep 27, 2016 9:47 pm
Forum: General Philosophical Discussion
Topic: Phenomenological data and absolute certainty
Replies: 21
Views: 2615

Re: Phenomenological data and absolute certainty

As with many things, I come across a view/claim that I cannot resolve or that I don't completely buy. The claim is this: Absolute certainty is possible only via phenomenological sense-perception in any present moment (that is, sense-perception not separated by time). For example, "I am aware that s...
by akuma's chamber
Tue Sep 27, 2016 9:40 pm
Forum: General Philosophical Discussion
Topic: Phenomenological data and absolute certainty
Replies: 21
Views: 2615

Re: Phenomenological data and absolute certainty

The experience itself is the only part of it beyond questioning. Yes, that's my claim too. In other words, I wonder whether a schema might help to clarify: There are at least 3 epistemological knowledge sets when determing certainties: 1 a priori (deduction), 2 a posteriori (induction), and 3 pheno...
by akuma's chamber
Mon Sep 26, 2016 12:58 pm
Forum: Philosophy of Mind
Topic: Subconscious mind?
Replies: 44
Views: 5991

Re: Subconscious mind?

I think this depends on what subconscious mind refers to. A There's the Freudian type where a subconscious (and unconscious) mind operate similarly to a conscious mind except we're not aware of it. B Or there's the type where the subconscious mind refers to brain states that operate habitually via l...
by akuma's chamber
Mon Sep 26, 2016 9:59 am
Forum: General Philosophical Discussion
Topic: Time does not exist.
Replies: 547
Views: 49631

Re: Time does not exist.

bahman wrote:We experience forms and motions. Time is a concept that we use to have an idea about two motions, one is our standard clock and another is subject of our experience.
In my view, time is just a concept we use to describe/measure the process of change.
by akuma's chamber
Mon Sep 26, 2016 9:50 am
Forum: General Philosophical Discussion
Topic: Phenomenological data and absolute certainty
Replies: 21
Views: 2615

Phenomenological data and absolute certainty

As with many things, I come across a view/claim that I cannot resolve or that I don't completely buy. The claim is this: Absolute certainty is possible only via phenomenological sense-perception in any present moment (that is, sense-perception not separated by time). For example, "I am aware that so...