What is the Philosophy of Mathematics?

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Eodnhoj7
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Re: What is the Philosophy of Mathematics?

Post by Eodnhoj7 » Wed Dec 06, 2017 4:23 am

osgart wrote:
Tue Dec 05, 2017 7:10 am
Without definition, identity, unitization, constancy, conceptualization, relationship and variability then math is just fantasy.

Math needs logical basis to take on meaning.

I wonder if there are more operators in math yet discovered or realized. Fine!, addition, subtraction, division and multiplication, but what if there is more then those four.

1)If we look at the nature of number as stemming strictly from 1 as a positive value.

2) and all number stemming from 1, in itself being composed of 1

3) and all number being composed of 1 manifesting ad infinitum

4) Ad infinitum is 1 revolving into itself to produce all possible numbers.

5) All possible number exist through all mathematical functions, as all mathematical functions theoretically are strictly extensions of positive (addition) and negative (subtraction) values.

6) As all mathematical functions are extensions of positive and negative values (founded in basic arithmetic), these mathematical functions provide foundations for further mathematical functions (multiplication, division) ad infinitum in correspondence to the ad infinitum nature of number (considering form and function are interjoined as +1 and -1).

7) In theory there are infinite mathematics stemming from a core base synonymous to "1", and these infinite numbers/functions are a result of 1 revolving through itself.


Further portions of the argument are on this thread. If I am correct...if....then I might have found a multidimensional arithmetic function where you can plug in where you standard 2+2 instead of equaling 4 would equal (-3, -2, -1, 1 , 2, 4).
viewtopic.php?f=26&t=14835&start=30


Take a number 3 and create an operator concept, that 3 with 4 is equivalent to 120 , what would make that true. What power or force would make that true? :mrgreen:

surreptitious57
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Re: What is the Philosophy of Mathematics?

Post by surreptitious57 » Wed Dec 06, 2017 7:26 am

jayjacobus wrote:
light is not energy and should not be called energy
Light is electromagnetic radiation and both electromagnetism and radiation are types of energy
A photon is a packet or quanta of energy and it is entirely acceptable to describe light like this

jayjacobus
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Re: What is the Philosophy of Mathematics?

Post by jayjacobus » Wed Dec 06, 2017 1:17 pm

surreptitious57 wrote:
Wed Dec 06, 2017 7:26 am
jayjacobus wrote:
light is not energy and should not be called energy
Light is electromagnetic radiation and both electromagnetism and radiation are types of energy
A photon is a packet or quanta of energy and it is entirely acceptable to describe light like this
Is the source of light, light or is the source of light, light waves?

You don't understand what i mean.

jayjacobus
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Re: What is the Philosophy of Mathematics?

Post by jayjacobus » Wed Dec 06, 2017 3:16 pm

If you say light waves are light, you are completely ignoring what the brain does to process light waves and what people perceive as light. But what the brain does is critical to perception while light waves are a cause but not a result. In effect the people who say light waves are light are taking a naive realism approach whether they realize that or not. I am not a naive realist.

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Eodnhoj7
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Re: What is the Philosophy of Mathematics?

Post by Eodnhoj7 » Wed Dec 06, 2017 8:33 pm

jayjacobus wrote:
Wed Dec 06, 2017 3:16 pm
If you say light waves are light, you are completely ignoring what the brain does to process light waves and what people perceive as light. But what the brain does is critical to perception while light waves are a cause but not a result. In effect the people who say light waves are light are taking a naive realism approach whether they realize that or not. I am not a naive realist.
How can one see "waves" without "light". In these respects the light waves that compose "light" need "light" in order to see them. To use this further as part of the thread, we apply measurements which in turn cycle back upon themselves to justify measurement.

When we measure a phenomena what we do is either Unify it, or Individuate it into units. Either way we are applying "1" as a dimension which not only gives structure to our measurement but forms the very foundation of the phenomena being measured. In these respects, reality manifests itself as a complex form of self-measurement through 1 reflecting itself as the measurement affects the thing that is measured and the thing that is measured affects the measurement. In these respects, 1 is synthesized through the application of dimensionality as limit or no-limit.

Considering all axioms are founded as both subjective and objective measurement we can observe this form of reality as "Objective" in the respect we observe how Dimensions exist as 1 reflecting upon itself (such as in 3 dimensional realities), and we can observe Subjectively by applying these dimensions as "imaginary" through the application of -1 dimensions (imaginary lines, considering the point is the only objective universal).

Either way, the observation of dimensions breakdown to an understand of how 1 manifests objectively or -1 subjectively. In these respects all axioms are founded upon the observation of 1 as "unification" or "individuation/multiplicity" and in these respects 1 is the neutral space we use to form boundaries as limits and possible limits. Considering 1 is the only universal axiom, through the application of measurement through dimensions, what we understand of consciousness itself is 1 as a spatial entity manifesting itself ad-infinitum.

jayjacobus
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Re: What is the Philosophy of Mathematics?

Post by jayjacobus » Wed Dec 06, 2017 9:16 pm

Eodnhoj7 wrote:
Wed Dec 06, 2017 8:33 pm
jayjacobus wrote:
Wed Dec 06, 2017 3:16 pm
If you say light waves are light, you are completely ignoring what the brain does to process light waves and what people perceive as light. But what the brain does is critical to perception while light waves are a cause but not a result. In effect the people who say light waves are light are taking a naive realism approach whether they realize that or not. I am not a naive realist.
1 reflecting itself as the measurement affects the thing that is measured
Does not.

The rest of what you write doesn't make sense either.

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Eodnhoj7
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Re: What is the Philosophy of Mathematics?

Post by Eodnhoj7 » Thu Dec 07, 2017 4:45 am

jayjacobus wrote:
Wed Dec 06, 2017 9:16 pm
Eodnhoj7 wrote:
Wed Dec 06, 2017 8:33 pm
jayjacobus wrote:
Wed Dec 06, 2017 3:16 pm
If you say light waves are light, you are completely ignoring what the brain does to process light waves and what people perceive as light. But what the brain does is critical to perception while light waves are a cause but not a result. In effect the people who say light waves are light are taking a naive realism approach whether they realize that or not. I am not a naive realist.
1 reflecting itself as the measurement affects the thing that is measured
Does not.

The rest of what you write doesn't make sense either.
It does not, okay, why? The act of measurement is the application of 1 as both a unifies and individuator. We observe this in the application of boundaries whose roots are one dimensional, i.e. the line.

surreptitious57
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Re: What is the Philosophy of Mathematics?

Post by surreptitious57 » Thu Dec 07, 2017 4:53 am

jayjacobus wrote:
Is the source of light light or is the source of light light waves
Waves and particles are types of behaviour rather than actual states so light has wave like or particle like behaviour
but it is not actually a wave or a particle itself. This is true for all subatomic phenomena which display such duality

jayjacobus
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Re: What is the Philosophy of Mathematics?

Post by jayjacobus » Thu Dec 07, 2017 2:21 pm

surreptitious57 wrote:
Thu Dec 07, 2017 4:53 am

Waves and particles are types of behaviour rather than actual states so light has wave like or particle like behaviour
but it is not actually a wave or a particle itself. This is true for all subatomic phenomena which display such duality
People don't see waves and particles. Waves and particles are correlated to what people see but are not the same.

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Eodnhoj7
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Re: What is the Philosophy of Mathematics?

Post by Eodnhoj7 » Fri Dec 08, 2017 12:17 am

jayjacobus wrote:
Thu Dec 07, 2017 2:21 pm
surreptitious57 wrote:
Thu Dec 07, 2017 4:53 am

Waves and particles are types of behaviour rather than actual states so light has wave like or particle like behaviour
but it is not actually a wave or a particle itself. This is true for all subatomic phenomena which display such duality
People don't see waves and particles. Waves and particles are correlated to what people see but are not the same.
Actually the particle-wave is observed in the four elements of nature earth(solids), wind(gases), fire(plasma) and water(liquid).

jayjacobus
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Re: What is the Philosophy of Mathematics?

Post by jayjacobus » Mon Dec 11, 2017 5:00 pm

While numbers are a framework, mathematics are methods. This is fundamentally what mathematics are and should be basic to any philosophy.

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Eodnhoj7
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Re: What is the Philosophy of Mathematics?

Post by Eodnhoj7 » Mon Dec 11, 2017 6:00 pm

jayjacobus wrote:
Mon Dec 11, 2017 5:00 pm
While numbers are a framework, mathematics are methods. This is fundamentally what mathematics are and should be basic to any philosophy.
How can you seperate number from mathematics considering all rational numbers are rooted in positive and negative values? How is a positive value any different from addition? And what about negative numbers and subtraction? Considering the multiplication is rooted in "the addition of addition" and division as "a second degree of subtraction" how can methodology be separated completely from framework?

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