Is the Linguistic Turn opposed to using mathematics and formal methods in explaining some aspects of reality?

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rja2015
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Is the Linguistic Turn opposed to using mathematics and formal methods in explaining some aspects of reality?

Post by rja2015 » Tue May 16, 2017 1:31 pm

One of the most notable tenets of the Linguistic Turn is that language constitutes reality. One must, therefore, pay close attention to language and the way it is used to address or settle philosophical problems. Can this position be equated with the notion that mathematics and formal methods should and cannot not be used to understand some aspects of reality?

Impenitent
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Re: Is the Linguistic Turn opposed to using mathematics and formal methods in explaining some aspects of reality?

Post by Impenitent » Thu May 18, 2017 12:57 am

what exactly do you mean by that?

-Imp

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Seleucus
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Re: Is the Linguistic Turn opposed to using mathematics and formal methods in explaining some aspects of reality?

Post by Seleucus » Thu May 18, 2017 3:54 am

My view is that the "linguistic turn" is largely wrong. I have written up everything that is on my mind about the issue to date, except the "bare life" angle that comes up at the end of the discussion here:

viewtopic.php?f=21&t=22065

I've written about this issue in the context of national language policy and nation building. I would be happy if you were to comment there or to reply here after you have had a look at my take on this matter.

As to the mathematics question, I'm tempted to say it is moot since that depends on the linguistic turn, which when you scan through the thread on language policy you will see why I say is bogus. The only evidence I have seen that isn't totally hokey, like the Hopi and color work are, is the bilingual survey research in which respondents tend to answer more similarly to Anglo-Saxons when they complete a values survey in English. Since the statistical significance isn't huge, I'm inclined to think the suggestive power of collocation may be the explanation, and not linguistic turn. Happy to discuss this topic with you further....

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