Carreers and Camus

Can philosophers help resolve the real problems that people have in their lives?

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proXy124c41
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Carreers and Camus

Post by proXy124c41 » Thu Jan 28, 2016 4:59 pm

Despite having a Masters degree in Research Psychology with the intention of doing meaningful applied research, I currently ploy my skills as a researcher executive for a marketing research company. I am currently doing this for the money.

I wonder though, from an absurdist perspective, would I be justified in my choice of money over personal meaning. After all, it should allow me to taste the different textures of the world and travel, to experience things I wouldn't be able to if I earned little. And in the end, I die, Rot in the ground, regardless of whether I published a policy changing paper on human cognition in the context of violence and firearm ownership or not.

How would an absurdist (and I know this shouldn't be used as an encompassing category that describes the behaviors and thinking styles of all whom identify as such) approach career choice? Specifically if the lines are drawn between legacy and social change vs money and pleasure?

Impenitent
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Re: Carreers and Camus

Post by Impenitent » Fri Jan 29, 2016 11:53 am

what is absurd is the belief that fruits of labor, which are never experienced, are absolute and perceived as intended...

-Imp

Dalek Prime
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Re: Carreers and Camus

Post by Dalek Prime » Fri Jan 29, 2016 8:14 pm

proXy124c41 wrote:Despite having a Masters degree in Research Psychology with the intention of doing meaningful applied research, I currently ploy my skills as a researcher executive for a marketing research company. I am currently doing this for the money.

I wonder though, from an absurdist perspective, would I be justified in my choice of money over personal meaning. After all, it should allow me to taste the different textures of the world and travel, to experience things I wouldn't be able to if I earned little. And in the end, I die, Rot in the ground, regardless of whether I published a policy changing paper on human cognition in the context of violence and firearm ownership or not.

How would an absurdist (and I know this shouldn't be used as an encompassing category that describes the behaviors and thinking styles of all whom identify as such) approach career choice? Specifically if the lines are drawn between legacy and social change vs money and pleasure?
The whole point of absurdism is that it doesn't matter what you do. Who cares, as long as you're okay with what you're doing til you rot.

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Hobbes' Choice
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Re: Carreers and Camus

Post by Hobbes' Choice » Fri Jan 29, 2016 10:18 pm

proXy124c41 wrote:Despite having a Masters degree in Research Psychology with the intention of doing meaningful applied research, I currently ploy my skills as a researcher executive for a marketing research company. I am currently doing this for the money.

I wonder though, from an absurdist perspective, would I be justified in my choice of money over personal meaning. After all, it should allow me to taste the different textures of the world and travel, to experience things I wouldn't be able to if I earned little. And in the end, I die, Rot in the ground, regardless of whether I published a policy changing paper on human cognition in the context of violence and firearm ownership or not.

How would an absurdist (and I know this shouldn't be used as an encompassing category that describes the behaviors and thinking styles of all whom identify as such) approach career choice? Specifically if the lines are drawn between legacy and social change vs money and pleasure?
Absurdism suggests that anything you do is ultimately meaningless. If you research what you are interested in, or what makes you money; neither matters. You don't even have a legacy.
For Camus, this reflection is empowering. And the answer here is do something meaningful even to the point of embarrassment - as in the end we'll all be dead on 100 years.
SO, you decide. Pleasure from money is empty; you'll get bored. So do your thing. Maybe keep your dreams

Dalek Prime
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Re: Carreers and Camus

Post by Dalek Prime » Sun Jan 31, 2016 4:40 am

Hmmm. Looks like we lost another one in action (or lack thereof). They keep signing up, and disappearing. Perhaps its the same person, who repeatedly loses his password, and signs up again lol!

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Hobbes' Choice
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Re: Carreers and Camus

Post by Hobbes' Choice » Sun Jan 31, 2016 2:36 pm

Dalek Prime wrote:Hmmm. Looks like we lost another one in action (or lack thereof). They keep signing up, and disappearing. Perhaps its the same person, who repeatedly loses his password, and signs up again lol!
https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=rY0WxgSXdEE

JSS
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Re: Carreers and Camus

Post by JSS » Tue Feb 02, 2016 8:29 pm

proXy124c41 wrote:Despite having a Masters degree in Research Psychology with the intention of doing meaningful applied research, I currently ploy my skills as a researcher executive for a marketing research company. I am currently doing this for the money.

I wonder though, from an absurdist perspective, would I be justified in my choice of money over personal meaning. After all, it should allow me to taste the different textures of the world and travel, to experience things I wouldn't be able to if I earned little. And in the end, I die, Rot in the ground, regardless of whether I published a policy changing paper on human cognition in the context of violence and firearm ownership or not.

How would an absurdist (and I know this shouldn't be used as an encompassing category that describes the behaviors and thinking styles of all whom identify as such) approach career choice? Specifically if the lines are drawn between legacy and social change vs money and pleasure?
Having been an engineer and psychologist, I take the engineering approach to psychology. The engineer always looks to see what the real, hard objective is before starting any endeavor.

What is the actual goal?

It takes a really good philosopher to properly answer that one without getting misled.
So how much are you willing to pay me to council you on that one?
:lol:

Dalek Prime
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Re: Carreers and Camus

Post by Dalek Prime » Thu Feb 04, 2016 5:57 am

Hobbes' Choice wrote:
Dalek Prime wrote:Hmmm. Looks like we lost another one in action (or lack thereof). They keep signing up, and disappearing. Perhaps its the same person, who repeatedly loses his password, and signs up again lol!
https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=rY0WxgSXdEE
Did you ever read Good Omens Hobbes? In it, it says that, if you leave a tape in a car long enough, no matter what the band is, it will become a Queen tape. :lol:

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Hobbes' Choice
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Re: Carreers and Camus

Post by Hobbes' Choice » Thu Feb 04, 2016 9:22 pm

Dalek Prime wrote:
Hobbes' Choice wrote:
Dalek Prime wrote:Hmmm. Looks like we lost another one in action (or lack thereof). They keep signing up, and disappearing. Perhaps its the same person, who repeatedly loses his password, and signs up again lol!
https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=rY0WxgSXdEE
Did you ever read Good Omens Hobbes? In it, it says that, if you leave a tape in a car long enough, no matter what the band is, it will become a Queen tape. :lol:
Odd, my car only has CDs, except a pile of Dire Straits tapes mysteriously in the boot.

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Gary Childress
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Re: Carreers and Camus

Post by Gary Childress » Sun Apr 17, 2016 10:17 pm

proXy124c41 wrote:Despite having a Masters degree in Research Psychology with the intention of doing meaningful applied research, I currently ploy my skills as a researcher executive for a marketing research company. I am currently doing this for the money.

I wonder though, from an absurdist perspective, would I be justified in my choice of money over personal meaning. After all, it should allow me to taste the different textures of the world and travel, to experience things I wouldn't be able to if I earned little. And in the end, I die, Rot in the ground, regardless of whether I published a policy changing paper on human cognition in the context of violence and firearm ownership or not.

How would an absurdist (and I know this shouldn't be used as an encompassing category that describes the behaviors and thinking styles of all whom identify as such) approach career choice? Specifically if the lines are drawn between legacy and social change vs money and pleasure?
Not sure what an "absurdist" would say, but I say we can't all be legacy builders or social changers. Someone has to "keep the trains running on time" and there is a lot to be said for such people (so long as the trains don't lead to Auschwitz, hence the occasional need also for legacy builders and social changers). When you take a job that pays well, you are (perhaps) doing a job that is relatively important and that not a lot of people are qualified to do. And in exchange for doing that job you can have some forms of pleasure that many others may not have the means to.

Legacy and social change are also very meaningful paths in life but working a 9 to 5 job is often drudgery in my book. I'm sure your life is not entirely fun and games and if that is the case then I wouldn't necessarily call it a life of "money and pleasure".

tbieter
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Re: Carreers and Camus

Post by tbieter » Mon Apr 18, 2016 5:20 am


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Gary Childress
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Re: Carreers and Camus

Post by Gary Childress » Mon Apr 18, 2016 10:33 pm

You found me. :D

Here is a little bit more on me if you're interested:

https://namigoblogs.wordpress.com/2016/ ... g-my-tribe

You may access my story above as well as those of several others diagnosed with mental illnesses here:

http://namigo.org/blogs-2/

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