Sphere Worship Universal Thread of All Religion and Philosophy

Is there a God? If so, what is She like?

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Eodnhoj7
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Sphere Worship Universal Thread of All Religion and Philosophy

Post by Eodnhoj7 » Thu Nov 16, 2017 1:47 pm

If one were to look within the history of Paganism a common theme, or bond, was the worship of the sun and stars as Deities in themselves.

Abrahamic faiths often equates the cellestial objects as being tied to spiritual entities, and while not "God" himself, in many degrees where lesser "gods".

Pre-Socratics and Socratics often equated the Sphere or Circle as both being Divine in nature and a symbol of the Divine.

What we understand of all moral systems breaks down to a circulation of "being" in the respect of the Golden Mean, Karma, or the simple metaphor of "You reap what you sow".

This common bond of circularity corresponds to the enlightenment where linearism and Man placing himself as "above the God(s)" later correlates with a lose form of atheism arising as man in his pursuit of Equality with God, in many respects seperated himself through the implication where he was not equal already. The pursuit of equality in many respects is a pursuit of seperation through individuation.

The question occurs, as to what is within the nature of the Divine that so many religions have found as "common" understanding other than a form of Justice through a symmetry of circulation?

In these respects, what we understand of both God and Man in regards to both spiritual and practical affairs is simply an application of geometry where man as "measurer" and God as "measurer" find a common bond through "measurement". It is within this divine image of rationality where Man is made in the Image of God, God is percieved in the image of man as both apply "measurement" as "being".

Many faiths argue man as the image of God with their dual opposite of Atheism, placing no God above man except man. In simple terms we understand God through Man.

Where vice is present, man argues "God is not here". Where virtue is present, man rejoices and says "God is here".

It is in these observations that a universal nature to both God and Man can be approached simply through the nature of the axiom as "self-evidence", or the synthesis of being from nothingness through the processes of self-reflection and the relation of oneself to others as a form of "cosmic dance" in which order "just is" and "always was" and "always will be".

All cultures used to dance with this universal pattern as a testament to a unity between themselves, their environment and eachother. Now we dance in a form of "jumping up and down" as if trying to reach the heavens but continually falling as if the Greek Icarus or the Abrahamic Lucifer.

Worship as dance has been reduced to a roaring wave of people reaching for a euphoria they never find as they reenacted the primordial chaos of the oceans...a movement seen at all concerts and modern "worship" services.

Progress past "the now" is merely a resolution to seek the end of everything, for progress exists if and only if their is an end. It is in these respects what we understand of Reality is simply a resolute determination to seek the end of ourselves in blatant disrespect of the absolute truth of "the now".

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Re: Sphere Worship Universal Thread of All Religion and Philosophy

Post by EchoesOfTheHorizon » Fri Nov 17, 2017 6:00 pm

Pagans are hardly united around a worship of the stars, bit of a dramatic oversimplification. Secondly, this presumes a exclusion of non-pagans, assuming by your western fixation Christians. This is unfortunately not the case, many mainstream Christian churches, such as the Greek Orthodox, still hold to Neo-Platonic ideas involving the heavens as spiritual gatehouses they must transverse, which is more in line with Cicero than Christ.

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Re: Sphere Worship Universal Thread of All Religion and Philosophy

Post by Eodnhoj7 » Fri Nov 17, 2017 6:53 pm

EchoesOfTheHorizon wrote:
Fri Nov 17, 2017 6:00 pm
Pagans are hardly united around a worship of the stars, bit of a dramatic oversimplification. Secondly, this presumes a exclusion of non-pagans, assuming by your western fixation Christians. This is unfortunately not the case, many mainstream Christian churches, such as the Greek Orthodox, still hold to Neo-Platonic ideas involving the heavens as spiritual gatehouses they must transverse, which is more in line with Cicero than Christ.

"A solar deity (also sun god or sun goddess) is a sky deity who represents the Sun, or an aspect of it, usually by its perceived power and strength. Solar deities and sun worship can be found throughout most of recorded history in various forms. The Sun is sometimes referred to by its Latin name Sol or by its Greek name Helios. The English word sun stems from Proto-Germanic *sunnǭ.[1]"


"The Neolithic concept of a "solar barge" (also "solar bark", "solar barque", "solar boat" and "sun boat", a mythological representation of the sun riding in a boat) is found in the later myths of ancient Egypt, with Ra and Horus. Predynasty Egyptian beliefs attribute Atum as the sun-god and Horus as a god of the sky and sun. As the Old Kingdom theocracy gained power, early beliefs were incorporated with the expanding popularity of Ra and the Osiris-Horus mythology. Atum became Ra-Atum, the rays of the setting sun. Osiris became the divine heir to Atum's power on Earth and passes his divine authority to his son Horus.[2] Early Egyptian myths imply the sun is within the lioness, Sekhmet, at night and is reflected in her eyes; or that it is within the cow, Hathor, during the night, being reborn each morning as her son (bull)."

"The Tiv people consider the Sun to be the son of the supreme being Awondo and the Moon Awondo's daughter. The Barotse tribe believes that the Sun is inhabited by the sky god Nyambi and the Moon is his wife. Some Sara people also worship the sun.

Even where the sun god is equated with the supreme being, in some African mythologies he or she does not have any special functions or privileges as compared to other deities. The ancient Egyptian god of creation, Amun is also believed to reside inside the sun. So is the Akan creator deity, Nyame and the Dogon deity of creation, Nommo. Also in Egypt, there was a religion that worshipped the sun directly, and was among the first monotheistic religions: Atenism."

"In Aztec mythology, Tonatiuh (Nahuatl: Ollin Tonatiuh, "Movement of the Sun") was the sun god. The Aztec people considered him the leader of Tollan (heaven). He was also known as the fifth sun, because the Aztecs believed that he was the sun that took over when the fourth sun was expelled from the sky. According to their cosmology, each sun was a god with its own cosmic era. According to the Aztecs, they were still in Tonatiuh's era. According to the Aztec creation myth, the god demanded human sacrifice as tribute and without it would refuse to move through the sky. The Aztecs were fascinated by the sun and carefully observed it, and had a solar calendar similar to that of the Maya. Many of today's remaining Aztec monuments have structures aligned with the sun.[9]"

"Sun worship was apparently practiced in Pre-Islamic Arabia, abolished only under Muhammad.[10] The Arabian solar deity appears to have been a goddess, Shams/Shamsun, most likely related to the Canaanite Shapash and broader middle-eastern Shamash. She was the patron goddess of Himyar, and possibly exalted by the Sabaeans and early Bedouin.[11][12][13]"

"In Buddhist cosmology, the bodhisattva of the Sun is known as Sūryaprabha ("having the light of the sun"); in Chinese he is called Rigong Riguang Pusa (The Bright Solar Bodhisattva of the Solar Palace), Rigong Riguang Tianzi (The Bright Solar Prince of the Solar Palace), or Rigong Riguang Zuntian Pusa (The Greatly Revered Bright Solar Prince of the Solar Palace), one of the 20 or 24 guardian devas."

"In Chinese mythology (cosmology), there were originally ten suns in the sky, who were all brothers. They were supposed to emerge one at a time as commanded by the Jade Emperor."

"Those who practice Dievturība, beliefs of traditional Latvian culture, celebrate the Sun goddess, Saulė, known in traditional Lithuanian beliefs as Saulé. Saulė/Saulé is among the most important deities in Baltic mythology and traditions."

"Though traditionally gods like Lugh and Belenos have been considered to be male sun gods, this assessment is derived from their identification with the Roman Apollo, and as such this assessment is controversial.[citation needed] The sun in Celtic culture is nowadays assumed to have been feminine,[14][15][16] and several goddesses have been proposed as possibly solar in character.

In Irish, the name of the sun, Grian, is feminine. The figure known as Áine is generally assumed to have been either synonymous with her, or her sister, assuming the role of Summer Sun while Grian was the Winter Sun.[17] Similarly, Étaín has at times been considered to be another theonym associated with the sun; if this is the case, then the pan-Celtic Epona might also have been originally solar in nature,[17] though Roman syncretism pushed her towards a lunar role.[citation needed]"

"The Ādityas are one of the principal deities of the Vedic classical Hinduism belonging to Solar class. In the Vedas, numerous hymns are dedicated to Mitra, Varuna, Savitr etc.

Even the Gayatri mantra, which is regarded as one of the most sacred of the Vedic hymns is dedicated to Savitr, one of the principal Ādityas. The Adityas are a group of solar deities, from the Brahmana period numbering twelve. The ritual of sandhyavandanam, performed by Hindus, is an elaborate set of hand gestures and body movements, designed to greet and revere the Sun."

"According to one hypothesis about Christmas, it was set to 25 December because it was the date of the festival of Sol Invictus. This idea became popular especially in the 18th[23][24] and 19th centuries.[25][26][27]

Another speculation connects the biblical elements of Christ's life to those of a sun god.[28] The Christian gospels report that Jesus had 12 followers.[29] which is claimed to be akin to the twelve zodiac constellations. When the sun was in the house of Scorpio, Judas plotted with the chief priests and elders to arrest Jesus by kissing him. As the sun exited Libra, it enters into the waiting arms of Scorpio to be kissed by Scorpio's bite.[30][31]

Many of the world's sacrificed godmen have their traditional birthday on December 25. During this time, people believed that the "sun god" had "died" for three days and was "born again" on December 25.[32] After December 25, the Sun moves 1 degree, this time north, foreshadowing longer days.[33] The three days following December 21 remain the darkest days of the year where Jesus (the sun) dies and remains unseen for three days.[34][35]"


"Solar gods have a strong presence in Indonesian mythology. In some cases the Sun is revered as a "father" or "founder" of the tribe. This may apply for the whole tribe or only for the royal and ruling families. This practise is more common in Australia and on the island of Timor, where the tribal leaders are seen as direct heirs to the sun god."

The primary local deity in Theosophy is the Solar Logos, "the consciousness of the sun".[39]

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Solar_deity



"Astrolatry is the worship of stars and other heavenly bodies as deities, or the association of deities with heavenly bodies. The most common instances of this are sun gods and moon gods in polytheistic systems worldwide. Also notable is the association of the planets with deities in Babylonian, and hence in Greco-Roman religion, viz. Mercury, Venus, Mars, Jupiter and Saturn." https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Astrolatry

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Re: Sphere Worship Universal Thread of All Religion and Philosophy

Post by Eodnhoj7 » Fri Nov 17, 2017 6:59 pm

African mythology

Anyanwu, Igbo god believed to dwell in the sun
Magec, Tenerife god of the sun and light
Mawu, Dahomey goddess associated with the sun and the moon
Ngai, Kamba, Kikuyu and Maasai god of the sun

Australian Aboriginal mythology

Bila, cannibal sun goddess of the Adnyamathanha
Gnowee, solar goddess who searches daily for her lost son; the light of her torch is the sun
Wala, solar goddess
Wuriupranili, solar goddess whose torch is the sun
Yhi, Karraur goddess of the sun, light and creation

Ainu mythology

Chup Kamui, a lunar goddess who switched places with her brother to become goddess of the sun

Arabian mythology

Malakbel, god of the sun
Shams/Shamsun, a solar goddess exalted in Himyar and by the Sabaeans.[1][2][3][4]

Aztec mythology

Huitzilopochtli, god of the sun and war
Nanahuatzin, god of the sun
Teoyaomicqui, god of lost souls, the sun and the sixth hour of the day
Tonatiuh, god of the sun and ruler of the heavens
Xiuhtecuhtli, god of fire, day and heat

Baltic mythology

Saulė, goddess of the sun and fertility

Basque mythology

Ekhi, goddess of the sun and protector of humanity

Brazilian mythology

Meri, folk hero and god of the sun

Buddhist mythology

Marici, goddess of the heavens, sun and light
Surya, the deity of the sun (Suriya Pariththa, Suthra Pitaka, Pali canon, Theravada Buddhism)

Canaanite mythology

Shapash, goddess of the sun

Celtic mythology

Áine, Irish goddess of love, summer, wealth and sovereignty, associated with the sun and midsummer
Alaunus, Gaulish god of the sun, healing and prophecy
Belenos, Gaulish god of the sun
Gronw Pebr, Welsh figure occasionally constructed as a god of light.
Étaín, Irish sun goddess
Epona, horse deity occasionally linked with Étaín.
Grannus, god associated with spas, healing thermal and mineral springs, and the sun
Olwen, female figure often constructed as originally the Welsh sun goddess.
Sulis, British deity whose name is related to the common Proto-Indo-European word for "sun" (and thus cognate with Helios, Sól, Sol, Usil and Surya) and who retains solar imagery, as well as a domain over healing and thermal springs. Probably the de facto solar deity of the celts.

Chinese mythology
Statue of the goddess Xihe charioteering the sun, being pulled by a dragon, in Hangzhou

Doumu, sun goddess sometimes conflated with Marici.
Yuyi, the sun god
Xu Kai, the god of the sun-star
Xihe, sun goddess and mother of the ten suns
Zhulong, dragon deity of daylight.

Egyptian mythology

Bast, cat goddess associated with the sun
Horus, god of the sky whose right eye was considered to be the sun and his left the moon
Amun, creator deity sometimes identified as a sun god
Atum, the "finisher of the world" who represents the sun as it sets
Aten, god of the sun, the visible disc of the sun
Khepri, god of rebirth and the sunrise
Nefertem, god of healing and beauty, who represents the first sunlight
Ra, god of the sun
Sekhmet, goddess of war and of the sun, and sometimes plagues and creator of the desert
Sopdu, god of war and the scorching heat of the summer sun
Ptah, god of craftsmanship, the arts and fertility, sometimes said to represent the sun at night
Khnum, god of sunset

Etruscan mythology

Albina, goddess of the dawn and protector of ill-fated lovers
Thesan, goddess of the dawn, associated with new life
Usil, etruscan equivalent of Helios

Germanic mythology

Sól (Sunna)

Greek mythology

Alectrona, goddess of the morning and man's waking sense
Athena, goddess of wisdom and crafts, with solar deity characteristics
Apollo, Olympian god of light, the sun, prophecy, healing, plague, archery, music and poetry
Eos, Titan goddess of the dawn
Helios, Titan god of the sun
Hyperion, Titan god of light
Neaera, goddess of the rising sun
Phanes, protogenoi of light and life, described with "golden wings", surrounded by the signs of the Zodiac and equated with Mithras
Theia, a titan goddess associated with the sun
Zeus, the king of the gods, which is equated with Helios and has solar characteristics in some regional cults

Hindu mythology
Surya

Agni, god of fire, associated with the sun
Aryaman, god of the sun
Mitra, god of honesty, friendship, contracts, meetings and the morning sun
Ravi, god of the sun
Saranyu, goddess of the dawn
Savitr, god of the sun at sunrise and sunset
Surya, god of the sun
Ushas, the goddess of light and dawn

Hittite mythology

Arinna, goddess of the sun
Istanu, god of the sun and judgment

Incan mythology

Inti, god of the sun and patron deity of the Inca Empire
Ch'aska ("Venus") or Ch'aska Quyllur ("Venus star") was the goddess of dawn and twilight, the planet

Inuit mythology

Akycha, solar deity worshipped in Alaska
Malina, goddess of the sun found most commonly in the legends of Greenland

Japanese mythology
Amaterasu emerging out of a cave, bringing sunlight back to the universe

Amaterasu, goddess of the sun

Lusitanian mythology

Endovelicus, god of health and safety. Worshipped both as a solar deity and a chthonic one.
Neto, claimed to be both a solar and war deity.

Māori mythology

Ao, personification of daylight
Tama-nui-te-rā, personification of the sun

Maya mythology

Ah Kin, god of the sun, bringer of doubt and protector against the evils associated with darkness
Kinich Ahau, god of the sun
Hunahpu, one of the Maya Hero Twins; he transformed into the sun while his brother transformed into the moon
Tohil, god associated with thunder, lightning and sunrise

Mesopotamian mythology

Shamash, Akkadian god of the sun and justice
Utu, Sumerian god of the sun and justice

Minoan mythology

A solar goddess of some sort, possibly the Snake Goddess.[5][6]

Muisca mythology

Sué, Muisca god of the Sun and husband of Chía; the Moon

Native American mythology

Wi, Lakota god of the sun

Norse mythology

Baldr, god associated with light, beauty, love and happiness
Dagr, personification of the daytime
Freyr, god of fertility, sexuality, peace and sunlight
Sól, de facto solar goddess.

Persian mythology

Nahundi, god of the sun and law

Polynesian mythology

Atanua, Marquesan goddess of the dawn
Atarapa, goddess of the dawn

Roman mythology

Apollo, the Greco-Roman god of light, music, knowledge, and the sun
Aurora, goddess of dawn
Sol

Sami mythology

Beiwe, goddess of the sun, spring, fertility and sanity

Slavic mythology

Belobog, reconstructed deity of light and the sun who may or may not have been worshipped by pagan Slavs
Dažbog, god of the sun
Hors, god of the sun
Radegast, god of hospitality, fertility and crops, associated with war and the sun, who may or may not have been worshipped by pagan Slavs
Zorya, two daughters of Dažbog
Zorya Utrennyaya, the morning star, who opens the palace gates each dawn for the sun-chariot's departure
Zorya Vechernyaya, the evening star, who closes the palace gates each night after the sun-chariot's return

Turkic mythology

Gun Ana, Turkic solar goddess.
Koyash, god of the sun

Zoroastrianism

Hvare-khshaeta, the sun yazata.

Zunism

The Zunbil dynasty and the subjects of Zabulistan worshipped the sun, which they called Zun. They believed that the sun was the god of justice, the force of good in the world and, consequently, the being that drove out the darkness and allowed man to live another day.





https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/List_of_solar_deities

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Re: Sphere Worship Universal Thread of All Religion and Philosophy

Post by Eodnhoj7 » Fri Nov 17, 2017 7:12 pm

Solar Cross

Solar Cross

The solar cross is probably the most ancient spiritual symbol in the world, appearing in Asian, American, European, and Indian religious art from the dawn of history. Composed of a equal armed cross within a circle, it represents the solar calendar- the movements of the sun, marked by the solstices. Sometimes the equinoxes are marked as well, giving an eight armed wheel.

The cross in its most simplified form (shown above) is known in Northern Europe as Odin's cross, after the Chief God of the Norse pantheon. It is often used as an emblem by Asatruar, followers of the Norse religion.

The Celtic cross is a symbol of the Celtic Christian Church, borrowed from the pre-Christian Celtic Pagan emblem of the God Taranis:

Celtic Cross

Lauburu

Lauburu

The Lauburu (four heads), a traditional Basque emblem, is also a form of solar cross

Gnostic Serpent Wheel

Gnostic Serpent Wheel

It represents the eight Aeons of Gnosticism. It is a emblem of the cycles of time and is a symbol of the Gnostic messiah- the eighth Aeon who brings awakening and restores unity. It is closely related to the eight-spoked catholic baptismal cross- the Sunday of the resurrection was for early Christians an eighth day, and symbolized regeneration.

This cycle was represented for some Gnostics by the serpent, who was associated with the "self-begotten" Deity by virtue of its ability to "give birth to itself" by the shedding of its skin.

Wreath and Staves

Wreath and Staves

The sigil is the identifying symbol of one of the earliest Druid reconstruction organizations, Reformed Druids of North America. It is strictly a modern symbol, having no root in historic Druidry.

Shamesh

Shamesh

A common symbol of the ancient Assyrian/Mesopotamian Sun God Shamash. It is often referred to as the "Seal of Shamash," and appears near images of the God, or to represent his presence when worn by Kings or in inscriptions. The Seal of Shamash is a typical solar symbol, and probably represents the Sun Wheel, or solar calendar, much like the Celtic Cross or the Pueblo Zia. The four arms most likely represent the solstices and equinoxes, which were extremely important calendar days in ancient agrarian cultures.

Star of Ishtar

Star of Ishtar

A symbol of the Mesopotamian Goddess Ishtar (Anath, Astarte, Inanna). The eight points represent the movements of the planet Venus associated with this Goddess.

Flower of Life

Flower of Life

The Flower of Life, a symbol most commonly associated with New Age permutations of Sacred Geometry, is a curiously universal emblem, appearing in religious contexts all over the globe.

The oldest example can still be seen at the Temple of Osiris at Abydos (one of many geometric arrangements of circles found there), it can also be seen in early Phoenecian, Assyrian, Indian, Asian, Middle Eastern, and later medieval art. The example at the Osireion, with its multiplicity of vesica pisces shapes, may represent the 'eyes' of Osiris- a symbol of the omniscience of the god.

The six-fold "see" pattern used as a basis for the larger pattern is often referred to on its own as the seed of life:

This delicate net of overlapping circles arranged in a six-fold pattern is called the "flower of life" because it contains a number of other shapes within its deceptively simple pattern, leading some to call it the "blueprint of creation." By connecting points in the pattern, a multitude of patterns and shapes can be traced, including a tree of Life, pentagram, and various representations of three dimensional objects.

Kuntenkanten

Kuntenkanten

Adinkra symbol for humility and modesty. (Oddly labled as "arrogance, pride."

Adrinkra (sometimes, andinkra) symbols are small, symbolic pictures used to decorate colorful patterned cloth by fabric designers in Ghana .

Nkontim

Nkontim

Adinkra symbol for loyalty and readiness to serve.

Tomoe

Tomoe

This symbol is ubiquitous on Buddhist and Shinto temples all over Japan . Its name is tomoe, meaning turning or circular, referring to the motion of the earth. The tomoe is related to the yin yang symbol, and has a similar meaning, representing the play of forces in the cosmos. Visually, the tomoe is made up of interlocked flames resembling tadpoles.

Mitsu Tomoe

The most common tomoe emblem has three flames (triple, or 'mitsu' tomoe), but one, two, or four are not uncommon. A mitsu (triple) Tomoe reflects the threefold division of Shinto cosmology, and is said to represent the earth, the heavens, and humankind. It is often associated with the Shinto war deity Hachiman.

Manji

Manji

The swastika used in Buddhist art and scripture is known as a manji (whirlwind), and represents Dharma, universal harmony, and the balance of opposites. It is derived from the Hindu religious swastika, but it is not identical in meaning.

The Manji is made up of several elements- a vertical axis representing the joining of heaven and earth, a horizontal axis representing the connection of yin and yang, and the four arms, representing movement-the whirling force created by the interaction of these elements.

When facing left, it is the Omote (front facing) Manji, representing love and mercy. Facing right, it represents strength and intelligence, and is called the Ura (rear facing) Manji. In Zen Buddhism, the Manji represents the ideal harmony between love and intellect.

International Banner of Peace

International Banner of Peace

The symbol and the idea for the International Banner of Peace were both composed by artist, mystic, and activist Nicholas Roerich. Drawn from various historical symbols, the figure was meant as a cultural equivalent to the Red Cross. The banner, meant to be flown over cultural landmarks, was conceived as a symbol of the "Roerich Pact," a treaty between nations designed to protect historical, cultural, and artistic heritage. The circle represents the unity of human culture; the three circles represent art, science, and religion- the three main vehicles of culture.

The pact, signed in the presence of Franklin Roosevelt, guarantees the protection of cultural sites even in times of war- museums, scientific institutions, schools, galleries, and the like are to be considered neutral and protected even during conflicts.

Ouroboros

Ouroboros

The Ouroboros is a greek word, and means "tail swallower." The ouroboros is usually depicted in the form of a snake swallowing its tail, and is usually circular, although it is sometimes depicted in a lemniscate shape. The ouroboros originated in Egypt as a symbol of the sun, and represented the travels of the sun disk. In Gnosticism, it was related to the solar God Abraxas, and signified eternity and the soul of the world.

In alchemy, it represents the spirit of Mercury (the substance that permeates all matter), and symbolizes continuous renewal (a snake is often a symbol of resurrection, as it appears to be continually reborn as it sheds its skin.), the cycle of life and death, and harmony of opposites. A double ouroboros (two creatures swallowing one another) in alchemy signifies volatility.

The Ouroboros appears in many other cultures and settings as well...the Serpent Jormungandr of Norse legend, who encircled the world, and guarded Yggdrasil, the Tree of Life, is often depicted as an ouroboros.

The Aztec serpent God Queztacoatl was depicted similarly, and Chinese alchemical dragons have both similar shapes and meaning.

Golden Dawn Cross

Golden Dawn Cross

With the Rose Cross Lamen, the rayed cross is one of the main symbols of the Hermetic Order of the Golden Dawn, an eighteenth century occult society. The symbol is a kabbalistic emblem (as well as a reversed seal of Jupiter). The upper cross represents the inner order of the organization, as well as the three supernal sefiroth of the Tree of life; the lower triangle represents the outer order, and the three central sefiroth. The rising sun within the triangle represents the sefirot Tiphareth, resurrection and rebirth.

Rose Cross

Rose Cross

The Rose Cross originated as a Christian symbol in the first century, and was later adopted as the primary emblem of the Rosicrucians, an esoteric secret society that originated during the Renaissance.

Rose Cross

The rose symbolized the redemptive power of the blood of Christ; the symbol as a whole illustrated the triumph of spirit over matter. A deeper, hidden significance of the symbol is the union of the rose of Mary with the Cross of Christ, the union of the divine feminine with the divine masculine.

Rose Cross

Chalice Well at Glastonbury

Chalice Well at Glastonbury

This is a simplified image of the design that graces the cover of the Chalice Well at Glastonbury , designed in the nineteenth century by archaeologist Bligh Bond. Crafted of wrought iron and wood, it depicts the vesica pisces, a symbol of the divine feminine, and Excalibur, the sword of the legendary King Arthur, who is believed by some to be buried at Glastonbury .

The wellspring at Glastonbury is considered to be one of England 's most Holy sites. The well itself dates back over two thousand years, and was sacred to both early Pagans and the Christians who later built an abbey on the site. Today, the well is a place of pilgrimage for Christians and Pagans alike, many of whom believe the red, iron rich water has healing and miraculous properties. The vesica Pisces theme is repeated in the shape of the pool at the base of the hill, where the water from the spring flows.

An old legend holds that after the crucifixion, Joseph of Arimathea travelled to England and hid the Holy Grail on the premises, accounting for the water's red hue. Modern Neopagans who use the site equate the waters with the menstruum of the Goddess.

Seux

Seux

The Emblem of Seax-Wicca, an Anglo-Saxon influenced branch of Wicca, symbolizes the sun, moon, and the eight Sabbats, or holy days.

Wheel of the Year

Wheel of the Year


The eight-pointed Wheel of the Year symbol marks the important holy days, or Sabbats, in the Wiccan Ritual calendar. It is derived from the sun wheel, or solar cross, a pre-Christian European calendar marking the Solstices and Equinoxes.

Hecate’s Wheel

Hecate's Wheel

Hecate's wheel is an ancient Greek symbol, and is an emblem of the Moon Goddess Hecate (Diana Lucifera), and her triple aspect. It is generally used by practitioners of Hellenic Recon or Dianic Traditions


http://www.world-enlightenment.com/Circ ... ymbols.htm

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Re: Sphere Worship Universal Thread of All Religion and Philosophy

Post by Eodnhoj7 » Fri Nov 17, 2017 7:15 pm

The Definition and Meaning of the Circle as a Catholic Christian Symbol
Catholic Christian symbolism in art provides a clear graphic illustration which represents people or items of religious significance. What is the definition and the meaning of the Circle? The Circle Christian Symbol represents eternity. The circle symbolises eternity as it has no beginning or end. Because of this many early Christians believed that there was something divine in circles. Early Astronomy and astrology was connected to the divine for most medieval scholars, the circular shape of the sun, moon and the planets were related to God's act of Creation. The following image shows the use of a compass to create the perfect circle. And a bright ring, or circle, is used ( halo or aureole) to surround the heads of saints and the whole bodies of other holy persons.

http://www.catholic-saints.info/catholi ... symbol.htm





The Circle is a fairly universal symbol among world religions, though the context may change. It is seen to represent the sun, the moon, the door through which we all were born, and the human eye. Since it has no beginning or end, it easily represents God's love; birth, the Alpha and Omega; eternity, that which has neither beginning nor end..

The circle has become a part of our religious heritage, seen for example in the rose windows of our cathedrals. Or take the tradition of the Advent Wreath, which may well have had its origins in a pagan past.

During the dark days of winter, sun-worshippers would burn a cartwheel to appease the sun god as they prayed for blessings of light and life. In the Reformation era, seeing the circular wheel as a symbol of the eternal, unchanging nature of God, Christians may have appropriated this symbol for their Advent observances. To symbolize God's gift of life, they covered the wheel with greens, and to symbolize the light brought into the world by Christ, they added candles.

There is a legend of how St. Patrick when preaching to some soon-to-be converted heathens was shown a sacred standing stone that was marked with a pagan circle or wheel, symbolic of the sun or moon goddess. Patrick made the mark of a Latin cross through the circle and blessed the stone, effectively creating the first Celtic cross.

It is a nice story but there may be a kernel of historical truth within it. Certainly it does point to a way in which the early Christian missionaries sought to Christianize the symbols that were familiar to the people among whom they were working - not destroying, but using them as a building block upon which to illustrate and expand their message.

One source suggests that the pagan sun wheel reminded the early Christians in Ireland of another earlier historic symbol, the wheel cross. The wheel cross, at least within the Christian community had in turn evolved from the chi-rho symbol. The Greek letter chi, the first letter in the title Christ - similar in appearance to the letter "X" - was rotated until it formed the shape of a cross. The Greek letter rho, the second letter in the title Christ-similar to the letter "P" - was merged with the rotated chi, and the whole symbol enclosed in a circle. Eventually the rho disappeared, leaving a cross in a circle. The combination of standing-stones with wheel crosses gave us the familiar form of the Celtic Christian high cross.

The cross with its characteristic circle is probably the most widely recognized of all Celtic symbols, emerging as a major sculptural tradition in Ireland, Scotland and other Celtic lands from the 9th century or earlier.

It might be seen as a criticism of Christianity that wherever its missionaries have gone they seem to have adopted the pagan or pre-Christian symbols of the people among whom they were evangelising, and simply pasted over a Christian meaning - rather as we might paper over the cracks on a wall. But that would be rather unfair, because the mission of these early Christian saints was one of transformation. The circle is a shape that is neither Christian nor pagan, but it is a familiar enough symbol within the natural world for it to have meaning for all.

http://www.faithandworship.com/circle.htm

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Eodnhoj7
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Re: Sphere Worship Universal Thread of All Religion and Philosophy

Post by Eodnhoj7 » Fri Nov 17, 2017 7:19 pm

The circle has been known since before the beginning of recorded history. Natural circles would have been observed, such as the Moon, Sun, and a short plant stalk blowing in the wind on sand, which forms a circle shape in the sand. The circle is the basis for the wheel, which, with related inventions such as gears, makes much of modern machinery possible. In mathematics, the study of the circle has helped inspire the development of geometry, astronomy and calculus.

Early science, particularly geometry and astrology and astronomy, was connected to the divine for most medieval scholars, and many believed that there was something intrinsically "divine" or "perfect" that could be found in circles.[3][4]

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Circle

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Re: Sphere Worship Universal Thread of All Religion and Philosophy

Post by DPMartin » Tue Dec 05, 2017 4:25 pm

gods were acknowledged by the worshiper for what is perceived as the provider for. such as the sun, or Pharaohs and Roman emperors were also acknowledged as gods. even the Lord God of Israel is acknowledged for being the Creator and Judge, hence the provider of all things, especially life.


but image or likeness is another thing all together. one can admire the likeness or image of any one or anything hence seeking to be like that which is admired. in the case of Christianity that likeness or image of God in the flesh to God's satisfaction, is fulfilled in the flesh via Jesus Christ.


and a cycle biblically speaking, is when something returns to its start, which is a time.

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Re: Sphere Worship Universal Thread of All Religion and Philosophy

Post by RustyBert » Wed Dec 06, 2017 6:50 pm

I'm not sure what the big deal is. All human societies seem to have a notion of "soup" as something watery to eat. Does that make soup divine or something special? No. What's happening is the OP is putting the cart before the horse. Humans are human. Regardless of where or when they lived they're going to come up with similar ideas, similar solutions, etc. There's nothing religious or spiritual or divine about it. And religion itself is just one of those things. It's a bunch of concepts and stories that helps people get along in a scary world, no matter what the time period is.

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Re: Sphere Worship Universal Thread of All Religion and Philosophy

Post by -1- » Wed Dec 06, 2017 7:02 pm

Now that round objects and straight line segments have been established as divine in nature, what other shapes are there?

Ovals. Deltoids. Schwastikas. Mogen Davids. Hammers and sickles. Stars and stripes. A maple leaf. A koala-bear shaped koala-bear. A coala-bear shaped coala bear. A blade of grass (spire).

In fact, if you are religious, all shapes, sizes, colours, and consistencies are divine.

Why conjugate it to death then? Can't you just simply say, "every shape and colour is divine, period, so now we can go home and get on with our lives."

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Re: Sphere Worship Universal Thread of All Religion and Philosophy

Post by Eodnhoj7 » Wed Dec 06, 2017 8:50 pm

DPMartin wrote:
Tue Dec 05, 2017 4:25 pm
gods were acknowledged by the worshiper for what is perceived as the provider for. such as the sun, or Pharaohs and Roman emperors were also acknowledged as gods. even the Lord God of Israel is acknowledged for being the Creator and Judge, hence the provider of all things, especially life.


but image or likeness is another thing all together. one can admire the likeness or image of any one or anything hence seeking to be like that which is admired. in the case of Christianity that likeness or image of God in the flesh to God's satisfaction, is fulfilled in the flesh via Jesus Christ.




and a cycle biblically speaking, is when something returns to its start, which is a time.
All forms, are merely grades of universal sphere.

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Re: Sphere Worship Universal Thread of All Religion and Philosophy

Post by Eodnhoj7 » Wed Dec 06, 2017 8:51 pm

RustyBert wrote:
Wed Dec 06, 2017 6:50 pm
I'm not sure what the big deal is. All human societies seem to have a notion of "soup" as something watery to eat. Does that make soup divine or something special? No. What's happening is the OP is putting the cart before the horse. Humans are human. Regardless of where or when they lived they're going to come up with similar ideas, similar solutions, etc. There's nothing religious or spiritual or divine about it. And religion itself is just one of those things. It's a bunch of concepts and stories that helps people get along in a scary world, no matter what the time period is.
Why the similiarities if seperate? What causes the universals, if they are even caused to begin with?

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Re: Sphere Worship Universal Thread of All Religion and Philosophy

Post by Eodnhoj7 » Wed Dec 06, 2017 8:53 pm

-1- wrote:
Wed Dec 06, 2017 7:02 pm
Now that round objects and straight line segments have been established as divine in nature, what other shapes are there?

Ovals. Deltoids. Schwastikas. Mogen Davids. Hammers and sickles. Stars and stripes. A maple leaf. A koala-bear shaped koala-bear. A coala-bear shaped coala bear. A blade of grass (spire).

In fact, if you are religious, all shapes, sizes, colours, and consistencies are divine.

Why conjugate it to death then? Can't you just simply say, "every shape and colour is divine, period, so now we can go home and get on with our lives."
As said on an above response, all geometric forms are merely grades of sphere...but circle can be included. Curvature, angles, lines, etc. exist as grades of an infinite circle/sphere. In theory is reality is one infinite sphere, all realities as forms, must exist as grades of it.

The sphere worship appears to not only be a common denominator, but an explanation of a causal source for life.

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Re: Sphere Worship Universal Thread of All Religion and Philosophy

Post by RustyBert » Fri Dec 08, 2017 7:19 pm

Eodnhoj7 wrote:
Wed Dec 06, 2017 8:51 pm
RustyBert wrote:
Wed Dec 06, 2017 6:50 pm
I'm not sure what the big deal is. All human societies seem to have a notion of "soup" as something watery to eat. Does that make soup divine or something special? No. What's happening is the OP is putting the cart before the horse. Humans are human. Regardless of where or when they lived they're going to come up with similar ideas, similar solutions, etc. There's nothing religious or spiritual or divine about it. And religion itself is just one of those things. It's a bunch of concepts and stories that helps people get along in a scary world, no matter what the time period is.
Why the similiarities if seperate? What causes the universals, if they are even caused to begin with?
Huh? Similarities because humans are, uh, pretty much the same all over. Sometimes in philosophy you have to be careful not to overthink things.

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Re: Sphere Worship Universal Thread of All Religion and Philosophy

Post by Eodnhoj7 » Sat Dec 16, 2017 2:19 am

RustyBert wrote:
Fri Dec 08, 2017 7:19 pm
Eodnhoj7 wrote:
Wed Dec 06, 2017 8:51 pm
RustyBert wrote:
Wed Dec 06, 2017 6:50 pm
I'm not sure what the big deal is. All human societies seem to have a notion of "soup" as something watery to eat. Does that make soup divine or something special? No. What's happening is the OP is putting the cart before the horse. Humans are human. Regardless of where or when they lived they're going to come up with similar ideas, similar solutions, etc. There's nothing religious or spiritual or divine about it. And religion itself is just one of those things. It's a bunch of concepts and stories that helps people get along in a scary world, no matter what the time period is.
Why the similiarities if seperate? What causes the universals, if they are even caused to begin with?
Huh? Similarities because humans are, uh, pretty much the same all over. Sometimes in philosophy you have to be careful not to overthink things.
And what is overthought exactly? Space is the universal median that binds us.

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